Transmit:Project – Are you the next big thing?

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Are you a musician/filmmaker/artist/photographer/organisation etc who would like more people to know about your work and what you do?

Perhaps you always wanted to know what musicians/filmmakers/artists/photographers etc live and work and create in Medway?

Would you like to transmit your art?  Would you like to project your talent?

Transmit:Project is a brand new project all about getting known.  Its all about providing a platform for upcoming and established artist and performers.  It’s all about having one place where people can go to find out more about the huge amount of talent that currently thrives in Medway.

This is going to be the place for local talent to be seen and heard.  This is going to be the place where audience inside and outside Medway will come to see what talent is around.  A while ago I wrote about some of the Medway scene with the popular Medway Visions articles.  I hope these will morph into transmit:project files as well as adding new ones all the time.

But it needs you.  Without talents to write about/broadcast then this project won’t get very far.  Make yourself heard.  Contact us.

Here’s how it works:

You send me a bio and some details about your work.

You send me a link to your work/send a cd etc.

With these things I can write about you.

You also send me a video file of you performing or a music video (musicians), interview/sequence of pictures of art (artists), sequence of photos (photographers) a short film (filmmaker).

With this I can post a clip of you/your work.  (If you can’t get a video file to me then contact me anyway and we can sort something out)

This will then be shown from the transmit:project broadcast channel:

http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8NHTvq6pzCSPZVfrOzDmzg

In time this project might spread out, but, for now, it’s all about Medway.  And what better place to start.  Transmitting art.  Projecting talent.

The Moon The Eye

transmitproject@themoontheeye.com

www.themoontheeye.com/transmitproject

www.facebook.com/Transmit.Project

Wild Whispers: Diary of a Filmmaker – Episode 2

You won’t need telling how important social networking is to filmmaking these days.  It has become an essential tool of the trade.  Facebook is great for getting friends and friends of friends onboard with your projects but it’s Twitter where things get really interesting.  I have had a Twitter account for years but only really started using it at the start of the year.  Almost instantly I started meeting all sorts of incredible people.  Yes, people who I might work with but also people who you can learn from.  As the old saying goes, independent doesn’t mean alone; and with Twitter you certainly enjoy a feeling of comradeship with other filmmakers, at all levels, working hard to make projects work.

It’s been a busy year for me full of networking and beginning new projects.  Of course, my main priority is to make a new short film and a second feature film but I also had released a DVD of my short films and my musical project 7th Adventure Recordings had just released a debut CD.  You can see them here: www.themoontheeye.co.uk/onlineshop

Also with new contacts and friends being made left right and centre a couple other projects barged their way to the front of the queue.  As well as this diary I also write a series of articles about the arts scene where I live in Medway, Kent, UK.  You can read them here:

www.themoontheeye.co.uk/articles

After writing about a couple of local musicians it grew into something interesting.  I was asked to make a video for the upcoming single by Medway band Stuart Turner & The Flat Earth Society.  I listened to the track and straightaway I wanted to work on the 1930’s feel of the song.  I shot, as I often do, very fast and edited within a couple of days or so. You can see the video to ‘Call Me Dave’ by Stuart Turner & The Flat Earth Society here:

Following this I was asked by Lupen Crook to make a video for the lead single from his new album.  The deadline was very tight on this on.  I worked day and night to pull off an ambitious shoot, people kept dropping out, as is often the way with non-funded projects but, if you have time you can get anything done.  You either need time or money.  We had neither.  In the end the idea had to be shelved.

It was a pity but also a bit of a relief as I could now take myself away from that particular project and get back to the long delayed writing. It was a struggle.  One of my problems (it happens to be a strength too) is that I have MANY projects on the go.  It became very easy to work on different projects but not really the ones I needed to.  Writing is hard, at least for me.  Any distraction would take me away from it.

Mr Young

Then came a family holiday in France.  A secluded little place, no internet.  It meant my online conversations, my networking had to cease.  It worked.  I started to think once more about, firstly, my next short film called Dreamplayr.  I needed to think about those characters, the situation, the problems.  I needed to stop thinking about my other projects for a while.  I needed to stop thinking about Twitter and Facebook and networking.  I even tried to write something but, and here is where it got scary, I couldn’t write a thing.  Well, nothing that was any good anyhow.   It felt like I really needed to get to the bottom, to totally switch off.  So, rather than panicking, I put my pen down and just let my mind sink to the bottom.  No doubt the vast array of French cheeses and wines on offer helped with that.  On the way home I could feel that, somehow, the story was ready.

Once I returned I switched on my computer and wrote Dreamplayr very quickly.  I’m happy with it.  It works.  I will cast and start shooting that very soon.

And so it seems that, for me at least, in order to communicate with the characters I’m writing about the only course of action is to retreat into solitude.   Perverse though it sounds to find out more about life and people we have to retreat from it.  At least for a while.

.Mr Young

Independent Filmmaker

www.themoontheeye.co.uk

www.twitter.com/Mr_Young

www.facebook.com/themoontheeye

This article previously published by The Indie Times (www.theindietimes.com)

Jonathan Livingstone Seagull Inspired Art Exhibition – UCA Pop Up Gallery – Chatham – 14th to 28th July 2012

The UCA pop up gallery in Chatham has a new exhibition between the 14th and 28th of July. The exhibition is inspired by the book “Jonathan Livingstone Seagull” by Richard Bach. The story follows the tale of how a seagull becomes tired of his seagull friends who continuously squabble over food and decides to instead concentrate on his flying skills. As a result he is outcast by the other seagulls and becomes a loner. He soon finds though that his brave, rebellious move has made his life more worthwhile and embarks on a whole new journey in his life.

 The artists exhibiting work inspired by the novel include Adam Piper, Sarah Wright, Kyveli Anastassiadi, Christine Hall, Alan Monk, Carolyn Birchall, Clair Archer, David Bradley, Eleanor Macfarlane, Layla Moore, and Richard Curtis. Natasha Steer is also exhibiting her unique interactive piece entitled “To Be Carried Out”. The canvas contains over 30 positive quotes from various historical figures including Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein and Henry Ford. The quotes are written onto cards signed by Natasha which can be taken away to keep, but if so must be replaced by another positive thought.

The UCA pop up gallery is in the upper level of the Pentagon shopping centre, Chatham.

Area: South East

Introducing A New Creatabot Contributor – Jane Ayres

Jane Ayres is a writer from Maidstone, Kent, who has just joined us as a valuable contributor. We thought you would like to know some more about Jane so asked some questions about her background and what inspires her…

So what is your creative background?

I’ve always enjoyed writing stories and had my first piece published in a national magazine when I was just fourteen.  I played piano from age seven, later trained to be a professional singer, and did my BA (Hons) in Music with Cultural and Community Studies at Sussex University in the 1980s. But the writing has been the one constant for me, and over the past 37 years my thirty novels have been translated into 7 languages and I’ve had hundreds of short stories, poems and articles in print.  In January this year, I finally started a blog http://www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk/

What other career paths have you taken?

Several!  I have a marketing diploma and a teaching certificate and after working in the sales department of a major publisher after graduating, I spent the last 25 years working in further and higher education, in marketing, outreach and also some teaching (music, dance, media and creative writing). I also set up and ran a mentoring programme for people wanting to work in the creative industries.

Who inspires you both locally and universally?

People who combine compassion and tenacity to change the world for the better.

What would you like to achieve in the future?

To use my writing as a tool to raise funds for a number of charities.

Can you recommend a creative website you love?  

I’m a fan of http://www.ifbook.co.uk/ which is at the forefront of the debate about the future of reading and writing, as well as Joel Friedlander’s brilliant http://www.thebookdesigner.com/ which generously shares his wealth of knowledge and experience to help writers publish their work using the amazing opportunities that the digital future offers.

To find out more about Jane please visit http://www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk/

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East    South West    Wales   West Midlands

Fabrica’s Newest Exhibition and Events – Cluster – Brighton – Ends 27th August 2012

Courtesy of Annemarie O’Sullivan

Fabrica is delighted to be working with Annemarie O’Sullivan, a UK basket maker to present Cluster, a new site-specific commission for the gallery.

A basket maker whose work ranges from small-scale domestic objects through to larger-scale woven forms, O’Sullivan mainly makes her constructions outdoors.  From her base in Lewes, East Sussex, she draws inspiration from the undulating South Downs landscape and from the theme of shelter.

For Cluster she says she started to think about “how people, creatures, and trees gather together. How we cluster together for protection and how, if needs be, we can become invisible in a group.”

Coinciding with the 10th anniversary of the iconic Sussex gridshell structures at The Weald and Downland Museum and The Woodland Enterprise Centre at Flimwell, O’Sullivan has drawn inspiration from the two buildings to produce a site-specific sculptural installation of elegant, organic beauty.

Cluster is a large-scale installation comprising a series of woven sculptures that allow the visitor to move in and around them. The work, combined with the architecture of the building, create both a social space in which to gather and play and a space of quiet contemplation.

Cluster was developed from an original proposal by Oliver Lowenstein, editor of Fourth Door Review, the structures have been made using finger-jointed sweet chestnut supplied by Inwood  Developments Ltd. www.in-wood.co.uk

Opening times

7-29 July, Wed-Sat 12-5pm and Sunday 2-5pm
1-27 Aug Wed-Sat 12-5pm, Sunday 2-5pm, late openings on Thursdays until 7pm and Bank Holiday Monday 12-5pm.

40 Duke Street, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 1AG

01273 778 646

EVENTS IN RELATION TO EXHIBITION

FABRICA-Artist Talk – Annemarie O’Sullivan Thursday 12 July 6.30-7.30pmAnnemarie will give an overview of her practice talk about her ideas and offer an insight into the development of Cluster. www.annemarieosullivan.co.uk

FABRICA-Basketry Workshop Friday 13 July 10-12.30pm – advance booking essential Led by Annemarie O’Sullivan (maximum 10 people). Explore simple basketry and knotting techniques, using flat band cane and harvested leaves. Find out about materials that you can harvest yourself to make baskets. Make a small vessel or a set of samples to take home.

FABRICA-Chaotic Cornucopia – an intense drawing experience Monday 16 July 12 -3pm – materials provided – £3.50 – advance booking essential A rare opportunity to spend three hours focused on drawing an abundant bundle of objects specially selected to compliment the summer show ‘Cluster’. In a calm and meditative atmosphere you are invited to lose yourself in the sensuous world of line and texture. Facilitated by artist Jane Fordham.www.smudgingandscratching.blogspot.com

 FABRICA-Rush Basketry Workshop Wednesday 18 and 25 July 10-12.30pm – advance booking essential. Led by Ruby Taylor (maximum 10 places). Inspired by archaeological finds dating back 5,000 years, learn the ancient technique of twining to make a small basketry pouch for modern-day usage: perhaps to hold your I-pod or mobile phone, where our ancestors used a similar basketry pouch to carry flint tools. Suitable for all levels including beginners.www.facebook.com/native.hands.uk

 FABRICA-Lunchtime lecture Wednesday 18 July 1.30-2.30pm

Ian Dunford from East Sussex Archaeology and Museums Partnership. Where we come from and how we lived. How did our ancestors build their homes? The East Sussex Archaeology and Museums Partnership team looks at some of the ways our ancestors constructed their homes from local materials and reveals how they use house building projects based on archaeological evidence to help contemporary communities discover our common heritage. www.esamp.com

 Visit to the Woodland Enterprise Centre, Flimwell, East Sussex Thursday 19 July 10am-4pm – advance booking essential (includes travel times to and from Fabrica). Get a behind the scenes view, explore the Gridshell building and explore the woodland to see sweet chestnuts growing, the sustainable timber used in this exhibition, with a tour led by David Saunders, forester and founder of Woodnet.  www.woodnet.org.uk

 FABRICA-Artist Story – Susan Collis Thursday 19 July 6.30-7.30pm Susan Collis is a contemporary artist who lives and works in the UK. Her practice combines a drawing process with installation and sculpture – often creating environments that at first confuse and then delight the viewer. Her work is held in many prestigious collections and she has recently completed solo exhibitions in galleries in Austin Texas, London, Paris and Spain. She will present an insight into the development of her practice to date. www.seventeengallery.com

 Visit to the Weald and Downland Museum Tuesday 31 July 10am-4pm, FreeFabrica will provide transport and a picnic. Get a behind the scenes glimpse of how the Downland Gridshell was built as well as a guided tour of the rest of the Museum.www.wealddown.co.uk

 Advance booking recommended for all events: info@fabrica.org.uk Call Fabrica on 01273 778646 www.fabrica.org.uk


Visit www.fabrica.org.uk for more details.

Area: South East

London Design Festival 2012 – Craft Central Events – 17th to 25th September

Celebrating the diversity of UK contemporary craft and design, Craft Central brings you 3 intriguing events for the London Design Festival:

One Day Designers Sale: Interior Products

Date: Monday 17 Sept 2012, 12noon – 7pm

Venue: Craft Central, 33-35 St John’s Square, London EC1M 4DS

FREE ADMISSION

Treat your home! Distinctive contemporary craft for the home at discount prices. The One Day Designers Sale is back… but think bigger, better and bolder for London Design Festival 2012. For one day only, find distinctive contemporary craft for the home by over 30 UK designers cherry picked to help spruce up your pad!

Delve through the tempting interior products on sale, including: Design K’s vibrant furniture; Charlene Mullen’s unmistakable cushions; IKUKO Iwamoto’s intricate ceramics; Loughlion Design’s ingenious kitchen solutions; and Kate Clarke’s colourful homeware to brighten any kitchen. Celebrate London and bring the city indoors with London Kills Me’s distinctive prints and Michelle Mason’s famous cushions.

Lighten up with HAM’s quirky ‘hammade’ printed products; Sarah Bonallo’s inventive upholstery; Namiko Murakoshi’s adorable Hairy Babes ceramics; Haidee Drew’s playful interior products; and bring a smile to breakfast time with Takae Mizutani’s My Egg & Soldiers tableware.

As well as sneak previews of exciting new work, snap up bargains from previous collections. Make the most of the extraordinary discounts on offer (with selected items up to 50% off retail prices) and make your house the envy of the street!

This exceptional shopping treat is topped off by meeting the maker in person – come and meet…

Alice Bree, Alison Brent, DesignK, Charlene Mullen, Chris Edwards, Daniel Spring, Deryn Relph, Gina Pierce Design, Haidée Drew, Helen Foot Design, Henna Craft, IKUKO Iwamoto Ceramics, Jane Sleator Ceramics, Jayna’s Designs, Scamp Baby Gifts, HAM, kate clarke London, The Intricate Project, Linda Gifford, Lok Ming Fung Ceramics, RALLI Design, martin Horgan, Suitcase Susie, Michelle Mason, Namiko Murakoshi, Nancy Straughan Printed Textiles, LondonKillsMe, Loughlion Design, Chairs By Sarah Bonallo, Stewart Martin Johnson, Takae Mizutani, Tina Vlassopulos, and Tracey Bush.

More details at  http://www.craftcentral.org.uk/september-sale

 

Inspired by London

Dates: 18-23 Sept 2012

Opening times: http://craftcentral.org.uk/calendar

Venue: The Showcase, Craft Central, 33-35 St John’s Square, London EC1M 4DS

FREE ADMISSION

Collective exhibition by seven London based designers. United in their passion for all things London, an eclectic group of 7 designer makers join forces for the London Design Festival. This London themed exhibition will showcase the diversity of art, fashion, interior products and jewellery inspired by our capital.

Exhibitors include:

Bronagh Kennedy – Distinctive limited edition digital prints inspired by London’s landmark buildings.

London Kills Me – Prints, cards, wall hangings and interior textiles inspired by the history and architecture of London and its changing urban landscape, using traditional artisan printing methods.

Vic Lee – Limited edition screen prints of London’s neighbourhoods and streetscapes.

Rosemary Lucas – River Thames themed contemporary jewellery, including sterling silver cuffs.

Michelle Mason – Interior products inspired by London’s bus destinations, its skyline, landmarks and iconic transport. Sarah Eyton –

Bold fashion accessories, including cuffs depicting London’s skyline.

Amy Keeper – A new collection of contemporary jewellery inspired by vintage London market traders tokens from Smithfield and Spitalfields Markets.

 

Rob Braybrooks – Exhibition

Dates: 17-23 Sept 2012

 Opening times: http://craftcentral.org.uk/calendar

Venue: The Corner Shop
Craft Central, 21 Clerkenwell Green, EC1R 0DX

FREE ADMISSION

Designer maker, Rob Braybrooks brings a slice of Cornwall to Clerkenwell for the London Design Festival with his hand cut wood relief wall hung designs and art pieces.

Inspired by the back-lit silhouettes and lines created in natural and urban landscapes, he produces delicate light birch wood hand cut relief upon dark painted frame boards. 

 

About Craft Central

www.craftcentral.org.uk

At the cutting edge of craft for 30 years, Craft Central (CC) is an oasis in the city – actively promoting, nurturing and strengthening the future of UK craft and design. Designer makers flourish through insightful support, affordable studio spaces, accessible exhibition facilities and valuable opportunities. We understand designer makers, connecting over 600 through our growing dynamic national Network. We build relationships within our creative community and reach out to diverse audiences. CC is a destination for innovative craft and design, showcasing stimulating exhibitions, talks and ‘meet the maker’ experiences. 

Area: London  South East

Wild Whispers: The Diary of a Filmmaker – Episode 1

It dawned on my fairly recently what a long hard struggle it is being an independent artist, possible more so being an independent filmmaker.  I thought, if only I REALLY knew what it was like in the world of filmmaking would I have done things differently?  I’m not sure.   In these articles I will document how things are in the indie film world.  I plan to shoot a feature next summer.  Will it happen?  HOW will it happen?  Well, dear reader, with any luck you shall be privy to the process, the ups and downs, the ins and out, the triumph and despair of such ventures.

I first decided I wanted to become a filmmaker when I was at college.  For a while before that I knew that I didn’t quite think in the same way as my peers.  I think I wanted to be a pop star but not playing an instrument, being able to write a song or even hold a tune put paid to that.  Then I saw a few films that left a mark on me.  I saw how film was going to become my form of expression.  It was more than that though.  It wasn’t just about telling a story, it was about creating a FEELING.  Even now, I’m not interested in art that just tells stories or in art for art’s sake.  I need to discover a FEELING.  I think that’s it, my overriding desire as a filmmaker is to create a feeling in films.  That’s the only way I can explain it, at least for now.

My first thoughts were ‘how will I make it in this industry?’  A mistaken thought.  There is no film ‘industry’.  Hasn’t been for a long time.  Not in the UK anyway.  Eventually I realised that there are creative people who work on films and filmmakers who create films from the bottom to the top.  I realised, after a brief flirtation in the erm, ‘industry’ that it was the latter camp I fell into.  So from now on it was a case of working full time to pay the bills but filmmaking was always my REAL career.

And that’s when the dawn hit me.  I was an outsider.  My role was to pull various fragments together from inside my head and from the real word to make things happen.    Years of hard work, years of working as an outsider to, well, pretty much everything.  The long slog.  This is a potted history, I will reveal more about these films, and the process of making them, over time.  First up, I made a few short films with varying degrees of success.  No funding, just using what was available to me.  Even back then it became fairly clear to me that public funding was a tricky issue.  I don’t have anything against public funding at all.  It is fairly obvious that it’s a deeply flawed system though.  Still, that’s a discussion for another day.

After a while it dawned on me that I needed to make a feature film.  Public funding simply wouldn’t be forthcoming for what I wanted to do so I set off to the Arctic to make a documentary about life up there.  How does that work?  Well, I volunteered for a charity and that effectively paid for my film.  The in-kind budget was around 10,000UKP.  Naturally, as is the way being an indie, I did the project for free.  Which was fair enough, of course, nobody asked me to do it.  It was my own project.  The film took some time to edit but ‘East 3 – Exploring a Frozen Frontier’ premiered in New York in 2007, went onto play in Chicago, toured the UK and then screened on UK television.  I was even interviewed about it on BBC Newsroom South East.

A few more short films followed (by now I was getting better at promoting them and they were all broadcast on UK TV).  The method and philosophy remained the same, shoot with what I had to hand, create a feeling.  This year I realised I had gone as far as I could with my old short films and so packaged them up into a compilation DVD ‘Caged Fire – The Short Films of Mr Young’  It felt right to say goodbye to these films as I now need to focus on a new set of objectives.  Yes, more short films but a feature film too.

Now, we come too making the second feature.  This time, a narrative film.  The question is, ‘how does one get from where I am now to making a feature length story?’  Will it even work out?  I have no idea.  Not yet.   I guess this diary will reveal all.

So, would I have done things differently?  I doubt it.  It’s very hard but also very rewarding when you follow your own path.  Right now the only genuine path for the independent filmmaker is the one you make yourself.  It’s a wild path with only whispers in the wind to help.  With any luck though I might see some paths that have been cleared already and I certainly hope, with the wise and not so wise words in this diary, I may just clear a path or two for you.

You can buy both  ’East 3 – Exploring a Frozen Frontier’ and ‘Caged Fire – The Short Films of Mr Young’ here:

www.themoontheeye.co.uk/onlinestore

Mr Young

Independent Filmmaker

www.themoontheeye.co.uk

www.facebook.com/themoontheeye

www.twitter.com/Mr_Young

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East                South West    Wales   West Midlands  

Garden Adventures – By George Langridge

This week I found myself a little busy with coursework, however I decided I would see what I could find in the garden. I was actually surprised at how pretty some of the things -that I take for granted- in the garden are.

Gardening, It’s Not For Me

I started out looking -with distracting hay fever- for little insects and quirks. This is what I found.

Green Bug

As soon as I stepped out of the door I noticed this little insect on the bush next to the window. I took this picture from about three or four different angles but decided to stick with this one as it is almost at eye level (from creatures perspective, as I’m not 2ft tall). I like this photograph because even though this insect is the same colour as the leaf the contrast -pumped in post- really makes it stand out. I also like the way it is a captured moment in this creature’s life.

Little Figure

Although this photograph isn’t artsy or particularly impressive in any way, I do like it. This is because it is actually cutely hidden in the garden, also it is fairly cute. In post-production I pumped the clarity and popped the blacks to add a bit of ‘pow’ to what was a terribly bland photograph.

Pretty Hidden Flower

I decided that I would look around the back of the bushes and in obscure places. I then found this flower and was amazed that the dog hadn’t yet chewed on it. I was tempted to make this black and white but then because it was sunny in the garden – I was sat on the bench editing- I thought it just had to be vibrant. As I gain experience with a DSLR I continue to be amazed at what my little 18-55mm -f/3.5- kit lens can actually do. I guess I am still amazed by depth of field.

To see the full resolution images and my other photographs check out my Flickr.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/georgelangridge/

I am currently looking for people willing to allow me photograph them candid. This would entail them doing what they do -ie. Working in a workshop/studio/kitchen- and have me photographing them doing it. If you would be willing to do this or model for portraits get in touch with me at georgelangridge95@gmail.com or on twitter @georgelangridge .

Twitter/Instagram: @georgelangridge

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East     South West    Wales   West Midlands

Hoodwink – The Art Project For Non Traditional Space – Open For Proposals – Ends 22nd July 2012


Hoodwink is a unique commissioning project initiated by Tunbridge Wells Borough Council Arts Development Unit that extends contemporary art practice beyond gallery spaces and public art arenas and places it slap bang in the middle of the hustle and bustle of daily life, such as in supermarkets, pubs and shopping centres, harnessing the potential for large-scale engagement with existing users.

Hoodwink is calling for proposals from artists working in the UK to make a site-specific response to an independent music venue, The Forum in Tunbridge Wells. The commission, worth £7000, represents an exciting opportunity for the artist involved to work in new ways and reach new audiences by showing in a non-traditional space and to make new connections with Kent physically and theoretically.

They have organised 2 open sessions to view the venue, talk to staff and Hoodwink project managers on 2nd July and 3rd July.

For more details and to download a brief go to: http://www2.tunbridgewells.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=4857

Contact by emailing: hoodwink@tunbridgewells.gov.uk

Connect on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/groups/396956693682730/

Area: South East  London

Art Odds and Art Sods – All Work Under £50 – Group Exhibition at Deaf Cat Coffee Bar – Rochester – 25th June to 15th July 2012

Art Odds and Art Sods is a group show at The Deaf Cat Coffee Bar, Rochester, featuring prints, paintings, books, photographs, jewellery and hats from:

Wolf Howard
Matthew Bray
Jim Hill
Sara Norling
Rikard Osterlund
Darrell Hawkins
Bjorn Veno
Zara Carpenter

ALL WORK UNDER £50!! A great way to start collecting art!

From 25th June -15th July (10.00am-5.00pm)

Deaf Cat Coffee Bar

83 High Street

Rochester

Kent

Area: South East

A Medway Vision Special – Why Medway Needs a Film Festival

Yes, I know.  I’m a filmmaker.  It’d be strange if I DIDN’T want a film festival in Medway.  But the fact is, Medway needs a film festival and what’s more there are some very pertinent reasons why:

1/  Strategy – One of Medway council’s priorities is to harness the creative industries to bring cash and other nice things into the area.  What better way to do that than to set-up a festival that draws punters in and gets them drinking and eating in local venues?  Good for creativity, good for the local economy.

2/  Skills sharing – It’s not just about money either.  It’s about building confidence, skills, pride and hearing voices.  Local people from all walks of life can get involved, from the volunteers who help set it up to the local talent who can display their hard work.  Alongside this, local and not so local filmmakers can share skills with a variety of local communities in order to develop voices, to develop the Medway story, if you will.

3/   Special times, special measures – As I have been arguing in these articles, Medway is in a special place artistically right now.  This needs to be capitalised on.  Film festivals mean creative guests, means more networking, means more creativity.  It’s a win, win situation.

4/  Prestige – Most self-respecting places the size of Medway have film festivals.  And I believe we are more creative than most.  Many of these festivals start off small, some even remain small.  But the point is, knowing your town will be hosting a selection of the best moving pictures from around the world AND running them side by side with local work that’s equally as effecting can only be a good thing.

5/  Promoting and watching film – I don’t mean the standard Odeon fare.  That’s easy to see.  Just go to the Odeon or pop the tele on if that’s your bag.  I mean the more leftfield stuff, the challenging films that build from the film festivals to become important pieces of cinema.  Surely we want to be part of that?  Surely we want access to films not available at the cinema chains?

6/  Education – What better way to convince the next generation, or even this generation of film fans, that there is more to life than chain cinema films?  Independent features, international documentaries, short films, music videos…you can almost taste the excitement can’t you?

7/ It’s already started – Yeah, I couldn’t resist.  I’ve already set up the webpage www.medwayvisions.tumblr.com in the hope that the creative people of Medway come on board and that the audience will be willing to come and watch.  My film company The Moon The Eye will run the show but I can’t do it on my own.  Heck, I wouldn’t even want to try.  It needs people, organisations on board to lend a hand in whatever way they know how.  Yes, it NEEDS you.  It’s here, but it will only work if we ALL get involved.

So, who’s with me?

.

Mr Young

Independent Filmmaker

www.themoontheeye.co.uk

www.twitter.com/Mr_Young

www.facebook.com/themoontheeye

Mr Young

Fashionable Structures Exhibition – 27th June to 9th July 2012 – UCA Pop Up Gallery – Chatham – Kent

Emerging from the recent UCA Final Shows, Fashionable Structures exhibition is a fusion of selected Architecture and Fashion work, which have been brought together to highlight where they coincide, as mediums and ideas.

Fashionable Structures includes work ranging from garments to digital design, drawings, models, video and photography.

The exhibition will take part in the Medway Open Studios on the 7th and 8th of July.

Launch: 27th June  4pm -7pm

Opening Times

Monday:
10:00
17:00
Tuesday:
Closed
Closed
Wednesday:
10:00
17:00
Thursday:
Closed
Closed
Friday:
Closed
Closed
Saturday:
10:00
17:00
Sunday:
Closed
Closed

The gallery is located on the upper level of the Pentagon Shopping Centre.

Area: South East

Artists in the Woods – Sunday 8th July 2012 – Oare Gunpowder Works Country Park – Faversham – Kent

The Swale Arts Forum are happy  to be organising this years GREEN EVENT in association with the Friends of Oare Gunpowder works, Swale Borough Councils Park Dept and Groundworks Medway .

Artists booked in:

BIG Fish
The Gunpowder Works x5
Los Salvadores
Swale Sings
Tel Tyler
Ken Rowles
Mark Thatcher
Sheppey and Sittingbourne Writers
Sioux Peto – Litter Angels
Dean Tweedy
ECO SHED
Polka Dot Arts
Val Tyler
Colin Barnard
Nick Stewart
Daniel Nash
Andrew Parker
DaniArt photography
Marvellous Murals- facepainting

Friends of Oare

Swale Arts Forum

For more details please visit www.swaleartsforum.org/artists-in-the-woods-2012

Area : South East

My Life’s Fascination With Fashion – The Story Of Henrietta Franklin

Henrietta Franklin is a fashion label run by Sharon Richards from her shop and studio in Gillingham, Kent. Designing and making made to measure garments for women and children, Sharon is one of the few fashion designers that still see’s through each stage of her garments being made – from her initial sketch through to the finished garment. Sharon talked to Creatabot to tell our readers how she got into fashion and remains independent as a designer…

I progressed into fashion naturally, I believe because I was an only child for the first 8 years of my life as well as the fact  I was also an only child among my parents’s piers. Let me explain: on birthdays and at Christmas I received many presents, one year when I was about 8 I had accumulated 7 dolls and they all needed clothes! My mother dabbled in making curtains and the odd dress for me, which is where I got started, by using the off cuts. I began by making dolls clothes and my hunger for clothes making and design progressed from there. At John Burn’s primary school, Battersea, we had needle work lessons, which stretched my imagination. At secondary school, Garret Green, Tooting, I took needle work and art as subjects, which I enjoyed. I remember my art teacher Sue Skelton, she was very inspirational. She opened my mind to many options in art and design.

I went onto to study at the London College of Fashion, I remember the interview day.  I remember what I wore, of course I do, I designed and made it! To this day I believe that was the biggest and most important event of my life to date. I got in! I studied there for 4 years, it was a wonderful time. I was one of the lucky ones: I was offered a job at my end of year fashion show: for an outer wear company.

“To succeed you would need to stand out and have contacts in large established fashion houses or be prepared to globetrot to places like China and India”.

From my experience I would say that my formal fashion education was paramount in facilitating my path in fashion. Unfortunately the fashion industry is an ever decreasing circle in this country. The combination of the intervention of computers and ever shrinking world make it feel almost like a pointless venture for new students leaving universities. To succeed you would need to stand out and have contacts in large established fashion houses or be prepared to globetrot to places like China and India.

The fashion industry “Rag Trade” that I worked in was primarily run by 3 ethnic groups. The largest of which was from a Jewish background mainly based in the West End of London, North London: Greek/Turkish Cyprian backgrounds, and the smallest group was in East London from Pakistani and Bengali backgrounds. I personally did not fit into any of these backgrounds so could only go so far. I started out as a designer/pattern/cutter at a Jewish company and ended up in design/sales at a Greek Cyprian company actually based in Cyprus. I felt that was the top of my career within the “Rag Trade”.

I soon reached a point though when I realised I wanted to be independent in my career, so the next natural progression was working for myself. This is when Henrietta Franklin came out of the shadows.

When I think about who inspires me today, I have to say Natasha Steer locally, she is an eclectic little maverick, she helps people to stand up for themselves, something she has done for herself successfully. She exudes confidence subtly. She is a bright light in the community that can only get brighter. Universally I have to back into history. Samuel “Sam” Sharpe – a Jamaican slave who played an instrumental part in the beginning of the journey that ended slavery. He is a part of why I am free and here today.

What about the future? I can answer that kind of question easily – to have a successful international business. Truly, in today’s economic climate my goal is to keep my business going.

Henrietta Franklin specialises in day wear, evening wear, wedding dresses, bridesmaids dresses and mother of the bride outfits. Sharon has also created the label “Tropical Fruit” which is her new range of hand made children’s wear made from natural fabrics wherever possible.

Visit www.henriettafranklin.com to see more of Sharon’s work.

You can contact Sharon on 01634 321 522

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