Create Jewellery – Lincolnshire: Jewellery, Tiara, Shoe Crystalizing & Christmas Decoration Workshops

At Create Jewellery, we offer a large range of workshops in both Kent and Lincolnshire. As well as one-to-one classes, we run workshops which typically have a maximum class size of no more than 8-10 learners to ensure you get the support and dedication that you deserve. Not only are the workshops a great opportunity to learn a new skill and hobby, but many use it as a way to start a new business from home! What could be better than sitting at home making jewellery to sell!

As well as learning, you will have fun chatting to others who share your interests, as well as drinking tea and eating cupcakes which is all included in the price! You will also get to make items at the workshops that you can take home with you, with the reassurance that all materials are included in the set price!

We have recently released the following workshop dates for Lincolnshire, held in Grantham:

Sunday 14 October

  • Wire wrapped coctail rings / bangles taster workshop (10.30am – 1pm) – £36 including all materials, cupcakes and tea/coffee
  • Shamballa and friendship bracelet workshop (2pm – 4.30pm) – £37 including all materials, cupcakes and tea/coffee

Saturday 3 November 

  • Vintage inspired jewellery, hair accessories & birdcage veils taster workshop (2pm – 4.30pm)
    £36 including all materials, cupcakes and tea/coffee.

Saturday 24 November

  • Jewellery making taster workshop (10am – 12.30pm) £36 including all materials and cupcakes
  • Tiara making taster workshop (1.30pm – 4pm) – £36 including all materials and cupcakes.

Sunday 25th November

  • ‘Decorate Your Shoe’ workshop (crystalizing stiletto heels or converse trainers)  – (10am – 2pm), £79 which includes over 1000 crystals that you will use plus other materials to crystalize your own shoes / trainers, as well as tea/coffee and cupcakes.

Sat 8 December

  • Beaded Christmas Decorations & Rag Wreath (2pm – 4.30pm) – £40 including all materials

Sunday 9 December

  • Tiara making workshop (10.30am – 2.30pm) – £69 – all materials & cupcakes included

For further information, please email Rachel at createjewellery@hotmail.co.uk or book online at www.createjewellery.co.uk

Folkestone Book Festival Events at University Centre Folkestone – 6th to 8th November 2012

As part of the annual Folkestone Book Festival, the community engagement
team from University Centre Folkestone have once more organised a series
of events with a range of speakers to inspire and stimulate discussion.
All events take place at UCF and are free to attend.  However advance
booking is required.   Events are listed below – click on the weblink
provided for all the details of each event, including information about
the speakers.  Thank you.

Tues 6 November
2.30 – 3.30pm: Celebrated journalist and writer Vitali Vitaliev gives a
talk about his book on Europe, Passport to Enclavia
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3482

6pm-7pm : Panel discussion: “Can a book save your life?”
Panellists include Vitali Vitaliev, Julian Baggini, Carolyn Oulton and
Jane Davis from The Reader Organisation.
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3485

Weds 7 November
6-7pm : The Ego Trick: talk by author Julian Baggini, writer, journalist
and co-founder of The Philosophers’ Magazine
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3479

Thurs 8 November
3pm  – 4pm: A Writer’s Journey.  Author Karen Lesley and Zoe Meyer,
Director of Zoes Books, discuss the creation of Karen’s book Coleman
(Female), with Zoe’s perspective on facilitating the book production and
working with the writer.
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3480

6pm-7pm : Panel discussion: “Should writers be their own publishers?”
Panellists include Zoe Meyer (Director of Zoe’s Books), Martin Latham
(Manager, Waterstones, Canterbury), Mark Swain, (writer and consultant),
Chris Meade (writer and Director of if:book UK), writer and blogger
Katherine May and writer and speaker Jane Wenham-Jones (Chairperson)
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3481

For more details contact UCF on 01303 760600 or email
jane.seaman@canterbury.ac.uk

The Winter Medway Open Studios at the Nucleus Arts Centre – 8th to 9th December 2012

2 buildings. 34 artists, crafts people and designers.

The Nucleus Arts Centre, Chatham, will be opening their doors and studios to the public for one weekend, the 8th – 9th December. as part of the Winter Medway Open Studio and Arts Festival. With such an array of local artists, designers and crafts people on show at affordable prices, you’ll be happy to leave the high street behind and come to Nucleus.

Nucleus Arts Centre and studios will be open to the public on 8th to 9th December from 10am – 6pm, 272 High street Chatham ME4 4BP

Resident artists open studios:
Holly Aird
Angie Berkley
Sian Bostwick Jewellery
Donna Chapman
Nick Evans
Jon Gubbay
Darrell Hawkins
Sophie Jongman
Sarah Langstone
Marissa Mardon
Maggie Osborn
Peter Reeds
Christopher Sacre
Deborah Saunders
Anne Taylor
Chris Van Beck
Alexandria Welch
Obi Photography

Area: South East

Why It Is Important To Write Contracts – By Natasha Steer

When I was 17 I made a music video for a local band, it was my first paid creative job. I assumed the band would help someone so new to the world of business and provide me with some promo. What in fact happened was that the band posted the video on their website and did not mention once who had made it. As you can imagine I was pretty upset and had a chat with the band to try to resolve the issue.

Kindly the lead singer suggest we form a contract, and helped me in putting something together. I learnt quickly how important contracts are, although sometimes I still forget, and then regret being so absent-minded.

We would like to think people won’t take advantage, but sometimes it is just a misunderstanding that can lead to issues. Therefore I highly recommend, even when dealing with friends and family, to have a contract in place where finances or even just recognition are an issue. The band as mentioned earlier, changed their website to give me recognition for the video I made and I agreed that I would not use the video for anything commercial without their permission first.

I personally feel we should always recognise people and attribute them where ever possible, which is why I love Creative Commons licences. For the benefit of others, here is a draft contract layout for people to use for their creative projects. Adjust as necessary.

Contract of agreement in relation to:

Between:

I                                        , in representation of                                             , agree to the following:

To pay                                          the amount of  £                     upon completion of

To acknowledge                               , where ever the work is used and displayed.

That if the work is not delivered there will be no charge/compensation payable by any parties involved.

Signed

Date

I                                      in representation of                                           agree to the following:

To complete the work requested by the date of

That if the work is not completed by this deadline, I agree to deduct the amount of                          for each week of the delay.

If the work is not delivered there will be no charge/compensation payable by any parties involved.

To ask permission to use the work for commercial reasons.

Signed

Date

Signatures witnessed by:

Print Name

Signed

Date

You will need to add requirements as personally needed for the project, and make sure BOTH parties have a copy. Here are some extra notes.

  • A witness is not really required for basic contracts, but I recommend it still. However a contract made with organisations and large authorities actually constitutes as a DEED and does always require a witness. For further explanation visit http://www.freshbusinessthinking.com/articles_print.php?CID=8&AID=1648
  • A witness of a contract must not be a relative or someone legally involved in the project.
  • There will be certain circumstances in which the creator and the person you are creating for cannot fill the requirements, for instance, you may get sick, they may get sick and they also may not be able to pay you! You need to add these details into the contract as to what the circumstances are if this was to happen.
  • I also found this article useful http://helgahenry.com/why-written-agreements-are-preferable-to-oral

p.s I am no legal advisor but realise you do not have to be to create a basic contract, however when large sums of money are involved and with big companies, I recommend taking legal advice.

By Natasha Steer

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Notes From The Creatabot Workshop: Expanding Your Creativity – By Natasha Steer

For the benefit of those who came and those who could not make the workshop here is a list of the subjects discussed. If you would like me to give the workshop in your area or in your community/creative group please contact me on natasha@creatabot.co.uk

EXPANDING YOUR CREATIVITY

WORKSHOP NOTES

  • Creatabot is an independent website and online magazine for creatives. Its aim is to inspire and support creative individuals. We work closely with the creative community to help develop ideas and try new ideas. We like to make things happen.
  • I work closely with coFWD – a community led work space. Find out more about them by watching this short film. coFWD is based at 161 Rochester High Street, Kent. You can pop by any time to find out more and see the space. Please watch the video before hand so you know what to expect! http://cofwd.org

Event Organising

  • If you want to organise an event, the best thing you can do first and foremost is write a press release. The basic order for a press release is the following:

Headline

Who?

What? 

When? 

Where?

Why?

Contact details

Image

You only need about 3 paragraphs of information for your press release.

Here is an example:

Artist Sarah Maple Launches Major Solo Exhibition

Artist Sarah Maple is to hold her first major solo exhibition at the Aubin Gallery, Shoreditch, London, from the 9th of February to 9th March 2012.

Sarah Maple’s exhibition “It’s a Girl!” takes a slightly controversial, but tongue in cheek look at what it is to be a woman and Muslim in the modern day. The work on show takes a more questioning look at traditionally accepted identity, gender and religion whilst revealing the young artists unique talent.

Currently living in Sussex, UK, 27 year old Sarah Maple has displayed work in various exhibitions in New York, Canada, Israel and Europe. Inspired by her own Muslim background, Sarah Maple uses photography and paintings to get her personal message across about subjects that have become socially acceptable and brings attention to the faults in this thinking.

End

Contact Details of Organiser

IMAGE

Creatabot can set you up with an account so that you can promote your creative related events, anywhere in the UK. email natasha@creatabot.co.uk to make it happen!

  • When you need an image to promote an event, do not use someone else’s images without their permission. It isn’t work risking! Instead go to Flickr and go to advanced search, use words linked to your event and tick the  Only search within Creative Commons-licensed content.

If the event is for profit then you need to tick the “Find content to use commercially”.

  • Find out more about Creative Commons Licences, it could protect your precious work also!

http://creativecommons.org 

All creatives need to know about these licences!

Online Presence

  • The key to social media ( Twitter/ Facebook) is NOT to try and hard sell.
  • Express your personality, whilst also being neutral and professional.
  • People can unfollow you / unfriend you for silly reasons!
  • Post images of your work.
  • Facebook and Twitter can be linked, so that you only post something once.

Pinterest is an easy way to create an online portfolio.

WEEBLY is a great easy way to make a FREE website that can be linked to your domain name.

POP UP SHOPS

Dan Thompson has put together the Empty Shops Network – which is a great resource for people wanting to run a pop up shop. The Pop Up Business of Dummies is brilliant. A PDF is available here:

http://emptyshops.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/developing-your-pop-up-plan1.pdf

But I recommend a hard copy, which can be bought on Amazon.

Pop Up Shop people:

Are willing to embrace the temporary nature of an opportunity, and agile enough to adapt and change as the opportunity does.

Always have an eye on the future, using a pop up to inform or inspire another plan or project, or to prototype a new business. They are interested in the long-term sustainability of their work.

Funding

The two main bodies for funding continue to be your local council and the Arts Council. Out of the two, your local council are likely to be more helpful.

MEDWAY PEOPLE: There is an artist resource centre inside the Visitor Information Centre in Rochester High Street. Inside the room there are folders packed with information about applying for funding with lots of different organisations, its brilliant!

You can book time in the room by calling  01634 338319

  • In the future in the UK, KICKSTARTER will be an awesome way to get funding. Have a look!

www.kickstarter.com

Community Projects

Helping your local community is a great way to expand your creativity, a great way to get people together for a particular project  is by using:

www.wewillgather.co.uk

That’s all for now! Thank you for reading!

By Natasha Steer

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

MAKE – Come and MAKE Things In Rochester – 13th October 2012 – 7.30pm

MAKE is an opportunity to get creative in any medium, in a social setting, and have lots of fun.

Moogie Wonderland are creating lots of Jellyfish for the Fish Disco at the end of October – and need lots of help! All materials will be supplied. Mainly for adults, but children welcome if supervised by a parent.

We recommend an apron or wearing old clothes!

WIFI will be available for those of you working on projects on your computer.

Time : 7.30 pm on Saturday the 13th of October

Location: 161 Rochester High Street

If you going to attend please post a comment below 🙂

Area: South East

Beach Creative Workshops – Herne Bay – Kent


In addition to ongoing exhibitions in their two galleries, Beach Creative in Herne Bay has launched some new workshops.  

  • Tuesday 10am-12noon – Calligraphy, £6 per hour. Must pre-book with Graham 07765 034908
  • Tuesday 7-9pm, £5 per session. Figure drawing (clothed) with Bobi Sanders. Must pre-book on 07512 341112
  • Thursday 10am – 12noon, £10 per session. Introduction to Art and Design (first week of four). Must pre-book with Sarah on 07943 731786
  • Thursday 7-9pm, £5 per session. Life Drawing (unclothed) – untaught session. Must pre-book with Gill on 07545 787955

Please visit the website for updates at www.beachcreativecic.co.uk

Area: South East

Leukaemia Research Charity Gig – Medway

http://www.facebook.com/events/443264375718033/

We hear all the time from charities that cancer effects 1 in 4 or us. For some of us this fact is closer to home than an appeal on TV. Would it surprise you to know that only one charity in the UK is actually fighting blood cancers? Leukaemia Research also boasts a 9 in 10 chance of survival in children because of their hard work and support from people like Andy Spring.

 In 2006 after a 2 year battle with Leukaemia Andy along with the support of his family began to raise money for the charity by cycling 35 miles from Ashford to Medway hospital. Raising £8000 along with nearly 50 other cyclist Andy managed to raise the bar again in 2008 and 2010 bringing a total of £26,000 towards the charity that is helping save lives like his. In Andy’s own words, “I wanted to give back something for the life I am so grateful to have, the whole experience has given myself and my family the chance to enjoy every moment we are together”.

Set for a fourth event, Andy unfortunately was set back when he urgently required a marrow transplant early 2011. Andy says: “I knew I could not cycle for a while but I was more determined than ever to do something, I just didn’t know what”. Next to two wheels music has always been Andy’s other passion. Picking up his bass he started to jam at practice sessions with Hesperian Wave. This gathering over the following months would bring a new outlook  and birth a new band a new style and a very new agenda.

Freshly formed and ready for their first gig The Furry Lovelickers shall be taking to the stage this Saturday September 29th alongside some of Medway’s longstanding and upcoming talents. Taking place at the charity cycle’s finishing line Medway hospital social club will be hosting from 7pm an awesome line up for a small donation of £3 entrance fee. See flyer for details. Also on the night Crybaby special and the monsters will be donating the proceeds of their EP on the night. you can check them here http://www.facebook.com/crybabyspecialandthemonsters

By Obi

Area: South East

Maidstone Film Fest 2012 + Call For Submissions

 

 

The hottest film festival this side of Cannes. This November Maidstone Film Fest 2012 will be coming to Stepping Stone Studios!
STARTING WEDNESDAY 14th NOVEMBER, THE PROGRAMME FOR THE FESTIVAL IS LOOKING LIKE THIS!

Day 1: Cinematic Culture Festival

Day 2: An exhibition of film: ‘The Progression of Cinema’
Day 3: Young film makers day
Day 4: A future in film
Day 5: The Nest
Day 6: European Cinema 
Day 7: British Cinema

Day one will explore international cinema confronting political issues through documentary. Meet the groups behind the documentaries; celebrate diversity and enjoy authentic native West Indian celebration and dishes!

The Progression of Cinema will explore the rich history of moving image. From the progression of audio/video technologies to the evolution of film and narrative storytelling, this day will explore the milestones that have swept the medium of cinema from silent movie to the influential pop spectacle that is today.

The young film makers day will be the chance to view the submissions of talented young film makers from the South East. They are calling for animations, short films, documentaries to enter into the First Film Development Award (for more info please contact Stepping Stone Studios). They will also be holding the Welikewhatwesee party in the evening – a crazy night of the coolest music videos of the last 10 years!

A Future in Film will begin with an 11am brunch networking session. Four industry experts will join us and share their knowledge and experience in a Q&A session, and the winning film makers from the previous days event will be screened.

‘The Nest’ is a chance for people to nestle on down and enjoy a chilled Sunday of film entertainment in its most popular form – Blockbusters! Think Hollywood; think popcorn, think bean bags and classic quotes. You will have the chance to vote on the Facebook page during the run up to this day and suggest a classic film to watch!

Monday will be European Cinema day. In this section they will have a look at independent cinema from European directors. Spanning a wide range of countries, this section is not for the faint of heart! Watch alternative films you never thought you’d see. Screenings will run til late!

The festival will be rounded off with a day long review of the best British film! From classics to contemporary, there’s no better way to round off the film festival than via a celebration of the groundbreaking of British cinema!

MORE TO COME AS THE PROGRAMME IS UPDATED! STAY TUNED!

Area: South East

A TALENTED PHOTOGRAPHER: HANNA – By George Langridge

If you can remember a while back I did an article about going out with a friend and -kind of- teaching her a little about photography and how to use a DSLR.

Recently, we have met up, once again to discuss photography, as is the creatives way. Since I published that article she has come a very long way, she has even developed her own style.

Not like your standard photographer? 

With this photograph I quite like how not all of Faith’s (the model) body is in shot, not only that but I like the way that with the addition of the large sunglasses we do not know whether or not she is looking at us or at something different. I am no fashion photographer but I know that it is keeping me rather engaged with the image. Personally in post production I would have lowered the highlights, however I feel that the highlights add to a possible harvest theme – based on the ideas that the shoot is in a corn field before harvest and very warm).

Hanna’s long term goals are to become part of the engineering industry and work with a top firm. I can’t help but think she’d be a great professional photographer, however, I can understand many of the things holding her back from following a photographers career.

Angles, angles, angles.

One thing I absolutely love about Hanna’s work is her interesting use of angles, I have thought this ever since I first saw her photography. When I’ve seen her shoot I have witnessed her move all over the set/location and find some pretty awesome photographs. I guess I am a little envious of this absolute angular skill. I also like the use of black and white here even though I am not much of a lover of black and white. Truth me told this picture may have converted me (Hanna, it’s your fault). Personally I would have lightened the shadows, added a little grain and pumped the contrast a smidge (what exactly is a smidge?)

I was surprised to discover that Hanna only uses a little Panasonic or Fuji bridge camera, can you imagine what work she could do with a Canon 5d mk 2?

I came across a few of her floral photographs and immediately  became amused.

Looks like film?

When I first saw this I thought Hanna had been at the film. However, she reassures me that all of her -recent, photographic- photography is digital. This photograph seems fairly intimate with the insect. It also has just the right aperture, as to give slight depth of field, many photographers would have just blown the background right out. I can’t deny that I would have probably missed this opportunity or if I had got it would have taken three different shots at different apertures, two of which would have probably blown the background in to space. The crushing of the blacks really works here as it makes the main focus (the insect) stand out subtly, sometimes when blacks are darkened it is done too much as to make everything else appear to bright. Again, here I would have probably dropped the highlights slightly to add some more detail to the insect.

If you would like to partake in a photowalk with Hanna, myself and other talented photographers (both digital and film) leave a commenthere (http://www.facebook.com/creatabot).

I am currently looking for some interesting places to shoot some street photography in London. If you know anywhere good, drop me a tweet or email: @georgelangridge   ,   georgelangridge95@gmail.com

Networking Vs Making Friends – By Natasha Steer

Networking can be quite a scary word to a lot of creatives, it evokes the thought of dressing up smartly and becoming someone they are not in order to secure business. Often at organised networking events you swap business card with potential clients and are asked awkward questions like “so where do you work?” and “how do you make money?” rather than the more interesting question of “what are you working on at the moment?”.

3 years ago I started going to a monthly event in Rochester, Kent, called Tuttle 101 – a relaxed event with a collection of various types of people focused on inspiration, collaboration and learning through doing. First held upstairs in a local pub the event now happens once a month in a local coffee bar. Yes this one single event opened up a whole new world to me, and through it I have made friends, not “contacts”.

Tuttle 101 lead on to the majority of us converting an empty bank into a co-working space, called coFWD. Here we work on our own personal projects, and similar to the ethos of Tuttle 101, we bounce ideas off one another and help each other to do what we do even better. This is not an office space, we even hung balloons from the ceiling to prove this. It is a community space, we hold various events for the local area, and we do things together socially as well. I describe it as working in a place where you have chosen all the people you want to work with.

 

So when did people start thinking that a networking event would encourage creatives? As a creative I can speak for most of us and say that often our motive is not money, it is to make a difference in the world. We want to earn a living yes, but do we want to start discussing how much money we make? No, our inspiration does not come from money, it comes from projects, people and places – to name a few.

I have yet to meet a creative who enjoys “networking” events, however I know many creatives who are happy to meet up for a coffee. Yet people continue to try and connect with creatives by arranging fancy meetings and networking events or workshops with the aim of “expanding business” and “making profit”. A huge majority of the time these type of events never really connect with the creatives invited.

Maybe some money minded people think they are helping a creative by convincing them to become more business orientated. I can tell you now, it isn’t going to work, our whole life’s ambition is to make things much more important than money. So if you are a business reading this, think about how you can help them make a difference, not make money. As Albert Einstein said “Try to become not a man of success, but try rather to become a man of value.”

By Natasha Steer

@natashasteer

natasha@creatabot.co.uk

The next Tuttle 101 event is on Monday 17th September 2012 at 9.30am at the Deaf Cat Coffee Bar, Rochester, ME1 1LX

If you would like to know more about coFWD please email me at natasha@creatabot.co.uk

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Wild Whispers: Diary of a Filmmaker – Episode 2

You won’t need telling how important social networking is to filmmaking these days.  It has become an essential tool of the trade.  Facebook is great for getting friends and friends of friends onboard with your projects but it’s Twitter where things get really interesting.  I have had a Twitter account for years but only really started using it at the start of the year.  Almost instantly I started meeting all sorts of incredible people.  Yes, people who I might work with but also people who you can learn from.  As the old saying goes, independent doesn’t mean alone; and with Twitter you certainly enjoy a feeling of comradeship with other filmmakers, at all levels, working hard to make projects work.

It’s been a busy year for me full of networking and beginning new projects.  Of course, my main priority is to make a new short film and a second feature film but I also had released a DVD of my short films and my musical project 7th Adventure Recordings had just released a debut CD.  You can see them here: www.themoontheeye.co.uk/onlineshop

Also with new contacts and friends being made left right and centre a couple other projects barged their way to the front of the queue.  As well as this diary I also write a series of articles about the arts scene where I live in Medway, Kent, UK.  You can read them here:

www.themoontheeye.co.uk/articles

After writing about a couple of local musicians it grew into something interesting.  I was asked to make a video for the upcoming single by Medway band Stuart Turner & The Flat Earth Society.  I listened to the track and straightaway I wanted to work on the 1930’s feel of the song.  I shot, as I often do, very fast and edited within a couple of days or so. You can see the video to ‘Call Me Dave’ by Stuart Turner & The Flat Earth Society here:

Following this I was asked by Lupen Crook to make a video for the lead single from his new album.  The deadline was very tight on this on.  I worked day and night to pull off an ambitious shoot, people kept dropping out, as is often the way with non-funded projects but, if you have time you can get anything done.  You either need time or money.  We had neither.  In the end the idea had to be shelved.

It was a pity but also a bit of a relief as I could now take myself away from that particular project and get back to the long delayed writing. It was a struggle.  One of my problems (it happens to be a strength too) is that I have MANY projects on the go.  It became very easy to work on different projects but not really the ones I needed to.  Writing is hard, at least for me.  Any distraction would take me away from it.

Mr Young

Then came a family holiday in France.  A secluded little place, no internet.  It meant my online conversations, my networking had to cease.  It worked.  I started to think once more about, firstly, my next short film called Dreamplayr.  I needed to think about those characters, the situation, the problems.  I needed to stop thinking about my other projects for a while.  I needed to stop thinking about Twitter and Facebook and networking.  I even tried to write something but, and here is where it got scary, I couldn’t write a thing.  Well, nothing that was any good anyhow.   It felt like I really needed to get to the bottom, to totally switch off.  So, rather than panicking, I put my pen down and just let my mind sink to the bottom.  No doubt the vast array of French cheeses and wines on offer helped with that.  On the way home I could feel that, somehow, the story was ready.

Once I returned I switched on my computer and wrote Dreamplayr very quickly.  I’m happy with it.  It works.  I will cast and start shooting that very soon.

And so it seems that, for me at least, in order to communicate with the characters I’m writing about the only course of action is to retreat into solitude.   Perverse though it sounds to find out more about life and people we have to retreat from it.  At least for a while.

.Mr Young

Independent Filmmaker

www.themoontheeye.co.uk

www.twitter.com/Mr_Young

www.facebook.com/themoontheeye

This article previously published by The Indie Times (www.theindietimes.com)

Art In The Dockyard Competition Returns For 2013

The Historic Dockyard Chatham is delighted to announce the return of its popular Art in the Dockyard art competition. Artists, professional or amateur, aged 17+ who live, work or study in Kent are warmly invited to register into the competition before 4 November to potentially see their artwork exhibited in No.1 Smithery Gallery which has hosted art exhibitions from internationally known artists such as Stanley Spencer and Billy Childish.

The competition hopes to find outstanding and inspirational artists who will capture the spirit  and extraordinary character of The Historic Dockyard, under any of the seven categories  – landscape, figurative/portrait, abstract, photography, sculpture/ceramic, mixed media (including textiles) and a special category for this year called Jubilee, celebrating the dockyard 1952-2012.

Registered artists will need to submit their final artworks, digital image or slides to the competition by 18 January 2013. Those successfully selected at the first stage will go on to exhibit in the public Art in the Dockyard Art Exhibition from February to May 2013. Once exhibited, an independent panel of judges will be awarding prizes in each category and presenting the overall ‘Artist of The Dockyard 2013 and Young Artist of the Dockyard 2013’ titles and prizes.

Artists are being requested to register their interest in this competition now, by completing and sending in the official registration form, which can be downloaded from www.thedockyard.co.uk or requested on 01634 823800. There is a £15 registration fee, which will provide the artist with unlimited access to The Historic Dockyard (this does not include entry into the galleries) to gather research and ideas for their creative works.

 For more information about the competition, including the rules and deadlines, please click on to www.thedockyard.co.uk/artinthedockyard  or email artinthedockyard@chdt.org.uk

Area: South East

 

Feed The Artists At Chatham Zoo – From 27th October 2012

A group exhibition with a difference featuring new work by Christopher Sacre, Marissa Mardon and Mark Barnes will be on show at Nucleus Arts Chatham Gallery from 27th October to 8th November 2012.

The ‘Chatham Zoo’ exhibition presents new work by Artist/Sculptor Christopher Sacre, Painter/Photographer Marissa Mardon and Illustrator/Designer Mark Barnes.

For the education and amusement of visitors the artists themselves will be exhibited in an enclosure, waiting to be fed inspiration and materials to create new work throughout the show. Come along, throw a tube of paint through the bars and watch what happens!

‘Chatham Zoo’ runs from Saturday 27 October to Thursday 8 November 2012 at Nucleus Arts Chatham Gallery, 272 High St, Chatham, Kent ME4 4BP (opposite Iceland). Open 10am-5pm Mon-Sat (closed Sundays). Admission free.

Exhibition preview/meet the animals: Friday 26 October 6-8pm, all welcome.

Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ChathamZoo

Area: South East

The Whitstable Biennale 2012 – Arts Festival – 1st to 16th of September

From 1-16 September 2012 Whitstable (UK) will play host to THE 6th WHITSTABLE BIENNALE 2012, a festival of new and ambitious contemporary art.

Already an important date in the art world calendar Whitstable Biennale has gained an international reputation for presenting work by some of the most important and exciting artists working today. Dedicated to presenting contemporary visual art, film and performance, the festival is a showcase for ambitious and experimental new work. 

New commissions include Jesse Jones, Benedict Drew, Cara Tolmie, Emma Hart, Patrick Staff, Ben Judd, Touch, Tessa Lynch, Tom Gidley, Tanya Axford, Angus Braithwaite, Martin John Callanan, Kieren Reed. The festival unfolds over three weekends and will extend into each Saturday night with a programme of talks, performances and a late night outdoor cinema. 

Full programme details are available at www.whitstablebiennale.com and a NEW Whitstable Biennale 2012 smartphone App will be available nearer the opening date. 

Notable highlights include: 

Ben Judd’s Vast as the Dark of Night and as the Light of Day, a new live work set on a series of boats that positions the audience, out at sea, as both participant and observer. Engaging the grey area between ritual and performance, Judd searches for an unreachable and idealised state of community. 

 A video installation by Jarman prize 2012 nominee Benedict Drew, NOW, THING, is set against the green screen surface of an indoor bowling green, making use of the super-real artificial ‘chroma-key’ green of the bowling surface in his installation.

Emma Hart presents Monument to the Unsaved #2 (M20 Death Drives), a new sculptural video commission, where wing mirror puppets drinking carved wood cocktails are trapped in a fantasy role playing game; amongst them is the character Emma Hart (2nd level visual artist).

Jesse Jones’ The Selfish Act of Community presents a dramatisation of an iconic encounter group therapy session that took place in the US in the late 1960s, aiming to prompt reflection on both the limits of the radical politics of that era and the potential resources it offers to our present moment of similar crisis and rising political dissent. 

 Three main programmes thread their way through the Biennale weekends.

 Programme 1: curated by The Island (Victoria Brooks and Andrew Bonacina)

Stages in the Revolution is presented by curators The Island, and takes its name from Catherine Itzen’s seminal book about the history of political theatre. The programme invites artists and audiences alike to move beyond the walls of the museum and experiment with ideas of community and sharing culture. Works include Patrick Staff’s series of stages constructed around Whitstable’s working harbour area, to function as new sites for performances, workshops and discussion groups, and also as new public spaces made available for impromptu use; Cara Tolmie’s performance in a large boatshed, and social historian and independent scholar Iain Boal’s guided walk through Whitstable, focusing on his research into the commons. 

Programme 2: curated by Jeremy Millar 

Artist and writer Jeremy Millar has selected an exhibition and talks programme, including a new audio-visual symphony by BJNilsen and Jon Wozencroft (produced in association with the renowned production company and record label Touch), and Speak Near By, a programme of artists’ film and video that explores the intertwining themes of rituals, dream, dance, and possession. The work of American film-maker Maya Deren, whose trance-like films and reflections on dance, anthropology, ritual, and Haitian Voodoo have been substantially influential for a number of subsequent artists, is represented by her classic film Ritual in Transfigured Time (1944-6). Joachim Koester’s 2007 film Tarantism revolves around the old southern Italian belief that the only antidote to the poisonous bite of the wolf spider, or tarantula, is a form of frenzied dancing. For his film New Dream Machine Project (2011), Shezad Dawood created a 3m high version of Brion Gysin’s ‘Dream Machine’, a spinning open drum structure said to lead the viewer into a hypnogogic state. Derek Jarman’s Jordan’s Dance (1977) will also be shown. All four films thus engage the body as a means of transportation to both another mental state and another time and place. A series of talks contextualising the programme include Siobhan Davies in conversation with artist Marcus Coates, and Producer John Wyver.

Programme 3: curated by Emma Leach 

Artist, and Whitstable Biennale’s Performance Curator, Emma Leach presents live performances and immersive and performative installations, with many of the works existing at the intersection of performance with other media, such as video, sculpture, writing and music. A strong concern shared by many of these works is the relationship between material things and the magic that makes them function. Works include Tessa Lynch’s Better Times, an exploration of different types of festival tent and the passive or active interaction they invite. Spanning a weekend, Lynch approaches this work as a 48hr festival which celebrates the nocturnal pastime of dreaming. The festival-goers (dreamers) are linked to each other through the geography they share and their collective engagement with the Biennale. The work is in three parts, each offering an experience for a single visitor to step into, including a dream hotline, a T shirt stall and a performance polling station. Angus Braithwaite’s The Sea is in my Veins, is part performance-lecture and part re-enactment, interweaving the artist’s own diving experience with a history of aquatic success and failure.

 The Biennale visitor HQ located on the main beach is a newly commissioned building entitled, Social Sculpture, by artist Kieren Reed. 

 With an extensive programme of performance, films, and events centred around its three weekends, Whitstable Biennale 2012 is an engaging encounter between innovative and experimental artists, diverse and curious audiences, and unique locations. Weekdays also feature new works, including John Smith’sSoft Work (in association with Turner Contemporary, Margate, Stour Valley Arts and South East Dance), and Oliver Beer’s A Philosophy of Education (Piece for two trebles, two grand pianos and an empty concert hall). The festival is accompanied by a lively festival fringe, the Whitstable Satellite.

Area: South East

Devon in Bloom – By George Langridge

Devon In Bloom

Last week I found myself in Devon, although a little overcast.

This first picture is just a quirky shot that I took one evening in the car, I think you will like it.

On a rather long tedious car journey I decided to fiddle with my camera, as aways, and this is what I came up with. I dropped the shutter speed just below what it should have ideally been, especially for a handheld movement shot. I set a wide aperture, held steady and shot with a timer. I am particularly surprised that this shot actually worked at all. In post production all I did was drive the blacks, add some vibrancy and drown the highlights.

This loverly little flower was found in the Eden project’s Mediterranean dome. Whilst still sweating from the rainforest dome, I placed my camera to my eye – rather uncomfortably I should add – and took a number of shots, trying to get them just perfect. This shot, in my opinion, is absolutely beautiful. It is so crisp and vibrant – although that is not usually my editing style – strangely with no bokeh in the background. In post I only increased the vibrancy, crushed the blacks and tinted the whites. I really do like the shot and would love anyone’s opinion on how I could improve my photography further.

You would be forgiven for thinking I have just come back from a rainforest somewhere. This little set up was in the rainforest dome at the Eden project. If I am honest I didn’t really like the RAW image when I imported it to my mac. However, after dropping the blacks, warming it up and dulling the highlights I grew a little attached to this image.

To see more photographs in their glorious high resolution, check out my Flickr.

I am currently facing a couple of issues, firstly I have reached my outright limit for my Flickr account and as a student cannot afford to upgrade my account. Does anyone know of any suitable and similar sites that I can showcase my photography on?

I am always open to criticisms, so please, if you can see where I can improve, do not hesitate to let me know. I am also up for  doing group shoots and photowalks, if this is of interest to anyone, let me know. I am contemplating on running a photography day; this will include a short photo-walk, a tutorial on editing in Lightroom and a group photo editing session. This has the possibility for some of the best/most interesting work to be displayed to the group and maybe even in an article.

Email: georgelangridge95@gmail.com

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/georgelangridge/

Twitter/Instagram: @georgelangridge

All image copyrights belong to George Langridge.

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Competition – Design a Poster And Win Corel PaintShop Pro X4 – Closes 1st October 2012

 

Each month at a venue called coFWD in Rochester, Kent, Creatabot hold a monthly event calledMy Favourite Things“.

The event aims to inspire and encourage people as well as get ideas flowing. Each person takes a turn to talk about something that inspires them and makes them happy in a friendly relaxed social atmosphere.

We want a poster to use to promote the event in the local area and online, and have a copy of Corel PaintShop Pro X4 up for grabs for the winner  – worth over £60.

The poster needs to be A4 size and have room to enter the different date and time each time the event is held. To get more of an idea about the event please visit http://favouritethings.eventbrite.co.uk

Please can we have your entry in digital format by 1st October 2012. Please send to natasha@creatabot.co.uk

Terms and Conditions: You must hold copyright to all work used. Please add your name onto the bottom of the work so that the poster can be used under Creative Commons licence:  Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA).

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Jeffrey Lewis and The Junkyard Gig – 8th September 2012 – Gillingham – Kent

When Jarvis Cocker hails someone as “the best lyricist working in the US today” you should really sit down and listen. Luckily for the folk of Medway the object of Cocker’s praise, Jeffrey Lewis, is making Gillingham the final stop of his UK tour. Accompanied by his band, The Junkyard, Lewis demolishes the cliché of the angst-ridden singer-songwriter and delivers midnight-tinged, wit-sharpened hymns to the human condition.

On his own, and with his band, Lewis has toured the world, playing with artists including Stephen Malkmus, The Fall, Devo, Devendra Banhart, The Cribs, Beth Orton…the list is packed with illustrious denizens of the off-beat musical underground. And when not making his six strings chime and chatter with everyday tales of the absurd, Lewis is a comic-book artist, having contributed to the New York Times and The Guardian, as well as releasing his own series, called Fuff.

Born in the Big Apple, Lewis made his name playing open mic nights in the city’s Sidewalk Bar with a host of artists that became associated with the antifolk movement. He certainly has stylistic similarities with that scene; off kilter singing, an acoustic backbone that can spark with the riot of punk and a wry, self-deprecating air. However, the magical simplicity and humorous insight of his songs strike such a chord that he sometimes feels like the only living boy in New York.

Since launching in September 2011, Tea Concerts has brought to Medway, Brighton and London some of the finest bands currently shaping the musical underground including: The Tigercats, The Bobby McGees, Darren Hayman and The Wave Pictures. Tea Concerts follows Jeffrey Lewis & The Junkyard with hip-hop legend Grandmaster Flash, at The Casino Ballrooms in Rochester, on 9 November.

To book tickets and to find out what’s coming up on the Tea Concerts calendar visit teaconcerts.co.uk, or phone 01634 545545. 

Area: South East

XX:ART returns with Ed Sheeran’s tour support: Lester Clayton – 9th September 2012 – Chatham – Kent

After the success of previous XX:ART events, the organisers are bringing another brilliant line up to town on Sunday 9th September with Lester Clayton headlining the gig.

Part political activist, part love-poet, Tottenham born Lester Clayton has a songwriting wit that’s been gaining fans and winning over audience since performing over 600 gigs in the UK and his nationwide support tour with Ed Sheeran. His reggae-infused brand of “Street Folk” with fiddle hooks and groove bass is fresh, poignant and totally infectious.

Lester has supported the likes of Ed Sheeran, Junior Marvin (Former Bob Marley and The Wailers Guitarist), Just Jack and Peter Doherty.

The main support on the night comes from XX:ART regulars Crybaby Special & the Monsters who since last playing for XX:ART have released their debut EP (produced by Babyshamble’s Mik Witnall) and Es Muss Sein; an acoustic / folk act who has recently supported Glasvegas, Story Books and The Wave Pictures.

Other supporting artists take shape of local favourites Tatterattles, Meg Janaway & Ellie Loft.

Matthew Tillman (promoter for XX:ART) – “After seeing Lester Clayton supporting Ed Sheeran, I am over the moon about welcoming him to our night in Chatham. He’s doing something really cool at the moment and his street folk genre is slightly different. He’s already supported some big names too, so we expect big things for him. Plus the supporting lineup is pretty huge too.”

XX:ART takes place monthly at Club Mojo (below the Command House) in Chatham, Kent.

Tickets are just £5 and available on the door. Further information can be obtained from www.facebook.com/xxartmusic

Area: South East

No Bell Prize 2012 – 14th September – Rochester – Kent

Creatabot presents an evening of invention, ideas and science. Many of us have had a crazy concept for a gadget or some type of aid for life. Yes most of them worryingly ended up on Google patents, but maybe you have one that you are not afraid to share.

The No Bell prize has only one rule for your inventions…a pretty obvious one. If you want me to spell it out…it mustn’t have any bells!

Creatabot will be picking 3 winners for the No Bell prize 2012, who will then be presented with a certificate and a round of applause.

Please bring drawings, prototypes and ideas to the evening – which will be held at 161 High Street, Rochester, Kent, ME1 1EH on the 14th September at 7.30pm.

Tea and coffee will be provided.

Please book via www.nobelprize2012.eventbrite.co.uk or www.facebook.com/events/177018619099647/

Please note, our venue (http://coFWD.org/) is a very old bank building that is being slowly shaped by a community of individuals for long-term Community Interest. Sadly the startup project is in its infancy and being run on limited funds so the building currently has some accessibility issues. If you have specific access or disability requirements and would like to attend an event or activity please let us know at least 5 days before the event date so that we can do our utmost to resolve any potential problems to accommodate.

Area: South East

Arts Council Empowers North Kent’s Creative Community

Arts Council England have announced that a community consortium from Swale and Medway has been successful in applying for a commissioned grant from its Creative people and places programme – designed to empower communities to take the lead in shaping local arts provision.

Swale and Medway is one of seven successful consortium applications across England that have been awarded a total of just under £16 million over three years, with Swale and Medway receiving £1,476,000.

Creative people and places takes a new approach by supporting communities and grass roots organisations to play a leading part in inspiring others to get involved with the arts.

The projects all employ innovative ideas for reaching new audiences. The Swale and Medway consortium comprises Swale Council for Voluntary Service and Volunteer Centre; Medway Council for Voluntary Service; Artlands North Kent; LV21; Kent Architecture Centre; Creek Creative Studios; FrancisKnight – project managers for Leysdown Rose-tinted ; and FellowCreative. The consortium will showcase and test new arts activities, support local people to develop their own creative ideas, help strengthen existing arts provision and celebrate what’s great about the arts. Three local authorities (Medway, Swale and Kent) will work with the consortium to develop the project. The consortium will be working with locally based arts and cultural partners to do this, including: Royal Opera House Bridge Organisation, South East Dance, and Kent County Council Libraries and Archives.

Carl Jeffrey, Founder of FellowCreative and a member of the Swale and Medway consortium, says: ‘We are thrilled to have the support of Arts Council England. This substantial investment will make a real difference to the communities of Swale and Medway. The long-term aim of our Creative People and Places vision is to enable a spirit of creative experimentation and the art of doing, together.

‘Initiated by an ever-developing network of small-scale, grass roots individuals and organisations, we hope that Swale and Medway become widely recognised as places where all forms of creativity can thrive; where communities directly benefit from the power of the arts to make positive changes in people’s lives; where new routes for engagement are opened up through testing out pioneering and experimental approaches.’

Sally Abbott, Regional Director, South East, Arts Council England, says: ‘We have a long history of working with artists and arts organisations in North Kent and we know that there is a real desire among people locally to get more involved in the arts and culture. We’re looking forward to seeing what ideas the community come up with to encourage more people to feel the benefit that taking part in the arts and culture can bring.’

Alan Davey, Chief Executive, Arts Council England said: ‘I’m excited by the possibilities of this programme and by the vision of the successful applicants.

‘All the projects have the potential to make a visible and lasting impact on the places where the work will happen and, very importantly, they all share the ambition to unite increased access with excellent art.

‘We’re looking forward to working with them to help them develop their ideas for creating and sharing great art for everyone – which is crucial to the vitality and long-term sustainability of the arts.’

The projects will be delivered by consortia and partners which include arts organisations, museums, libraries, local authorities and commercial organisations working in collaboration with the local community, grass roots organisations and the amateur sector.

The successful applicants will now receive a small percentage of their award in order to develop their plans. Receipt of the full award is dependent on the Arts Council approving each consortium’s full business plan. Round two of the programme will open to applications in September 2012.

The Creative people and places programme is one of a number of initiatives designed to help the Arts Council achieve its goal of more people experiencing and being inspired by the arts – as set out in Achieving great art for everyone, the Arts Council’s ten year strategic plan.

Keep up to date with news here: http://creativepeopleplace.info

Area: South East

Treasure Or Trash? – Artistic Freedom In A Digital Age – Free Conference on 20th September 2012 – Folkestone

(CC BY-NC 2.0) by naoyafujii

The future is digital. Traditional distribution channels are changing,
and whilst this offers unprecedented opportunities for artists and
creators it also raises issues around censorship, cultural identity,
ownership and quality control.  If the gatekeepers are removed and
artists, writers and musicians can be their own distributors, who makes
judgements about quality?  Should anyone? Or should we embrace an
artistic and social free for all? 

This event will be of interest to artists, performers, musicians,
writers, entrepreneurs, academics, students, philosophers and social
commentators. 

Venue: University Centre Folkestone 

FREE to attend but booking required – contact Jane Seaman – jane.seaman@canterbury.ac.uk

Key speaker Chris Meade, writer and Director of if:book UK

Other speakers include:  Matt Wright (composer, sound artist, Senior
Lecturer at Canterbury Christchurch University), Shane Record (visual
artist), Danuta Kean (writer and journalist), Greg Klercx, Director of
Reauthoring, and others to be confirmed.

Area: South East

The Hoodwink Project – Bringing Art Into Unexpected Places

Suzie Plumb and I work as Cultural Projects Managers for the Arts Development Unit at Tunbridge Wells Borough Council. We’ve recently received funding from various bodies, including Arts Council England, Kent County Council and Medway Council to embark on a 3 year audience development project: Hoodwink. This article aims to introduce the reader to the concepts behind the Hoodwink philosophy and to stimulate debate about the value of contemporary art in everyday life.

The Hoodwink team are trickster do-gooders, working at the very edges of curatorial practice. They target non-users of museums and art galleries and expose them to art practice in the most unlikely, surprising and exciting of places. By bringing the art to the people, their work creatively challenges current perceptions of exhibiting space and environment, and often deliberately subverts the traditions of curatorial practice in order to break down the barriers to engagement. They provide opportunities for museums and artists to expose their work to new audiences and develop their own practice through working in new site specific ways.

60 Large Aerial Photos have been on display in Chatham town centre, Kent. for a number of months. The alternative photography exhibition has brought a new look to the high street and has been a positive influence on the general public.

Hoodwink Venues

We will be commissioning work for 9 commercial venues across the next 3 years. Unlike other arts projects that have used empty shop spaces, Hoodwink venues are already occupied for commercial use, for example: supermarkets, sports centres and public houses. Showing work in these spaces targets non-users of galleries and museums by exposing the venues’ existing customers to the work on display in a comfortable and familiar setting.

We’re using Arts Council England research to define and target our non-users. ACE arts-based society segments define the majority of non-users into 3 categories: time-poor dreamers; a quiet pint with the match; limited means, nothing fancy.

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/research-and-data/arts-audiences/arts-based-segmentation-research/

Targeting is realised through community engagement undertaken by the commissioned artist during the research and development of their work, which will include creative sessions with venue staff, and from the approach to and presentation of interpretative material displayed with the artwork. The effectiveness of this approach was established through qualitative evaluation of previous audience development projects undertaken by Tunbridge Wells Museum and Art Gallery: Kentish Delights (2010 – 11) and Public Art House (2011-12, http://publicarthouse.tumblr.com). This evaluation exposed some exciting revelations:

  • Customers enjoy seeing things out of the ordinary in their daily lives because it gives them something different to talk about than the weather (Kentish Delights)
  • When staff are confident about a display, they enjoy talking to customers about it (Kentish Delights) Perceptions of customer service are improved if staff are able to engage with customers about objects on display in their venue (Kentish Delights)
  • Customers enjoy having an activity associated with the art on display, even if they don’t think it has anything to do with the art on display (Public Art House)
  • Customers are able to make meaning in their lives from engaging from art in this way (Public Art House)

Hoodwink will allow us to explore these concepts in greater detail, by commissioning artists to create work on a larger scale, and through experimenting with different types of interpretation.

Pubs will be one of the spaces used for the Hoodwink project.

Hoodwink Artists

Our commissioning process is very simple: once we’ve secured a Hoodwink venue, we agree an artist brief with the venue management, and advertise it as widely as possible across the UK. The brief asks that the artist respond to any aspect of the venue, its community, or the environment the venue sits in.

We also offer the artist the opportunity to work with a museum from Kent, by researching and selecting objects from that museum to be displayed in the venue. For many artists, this can give a local or historical context to their work, providing an access point to engaging with their work. This commission offers the artist opportunities to:

  • Engage with a new audience in a meaningful way
  • Expose their work to a large number of people
  • Develop their work in new directions, through responding to a commercial, competitive setting

Hoodwink Interpretation

Interpretation is a vital component of good engagement with contemporary art, and is an element that will be experimented with during Hoodwink.

Hoodwink aims to realign interpretation with marketing, and borrows from commercial practice to do this. Selling concentrates on informing the customer why a product is important to them, and therefore why they should invest in it financially and in many cases, philosophically and intellectually as well. Customers think carefully about what they purchase and what meaning this has to their lives. Decisions are based on having the essential information about a product accessible and available. Access to this information depends on the success of the marketing campaign in exposing it to the right audience.

Hoodwink draws its audience by selling information about the works on display, and this is approached through many different media and interactions.

Firstly it will look at building an audience in advance of the exhibitions of work at the venues, by generating interest through social media communities, exposing the story of the artists’ work as it develops from ideas to installation.

Secondly, interpretive material will accompany the artwork on display. This material will offer customers different ways to engage with the work on display, avoiding presenting a single-voiced textual interpretation and encouraging meaningful interaction. This is a creative and exciting curatorial challenge for the Hoodwink team and offers them the opportunity to:

  • Find and showcase effective models for meaningful engagement in real situations
  • Grow a vast audience for contemporary art
  • Work with different and unexpected specialists to achieve our aims.

Hoodwink has enormous potential to change arts practice and display, and it is something that we expect to gather momentum as it progresses. The social benefit of this change in practice can be enormous and life changing for everyone involved. We welcome your thoughts on our model and ideas at every stage of the project.

Our second commissioning opportunity is about to go live – we’ll be announcing it on our Facebook pages soon, so please join us at   http://www.facebook.com/groups/396956693682730/

By Polly Harknett

Hoodwink Project Manager

hoodwink@tunbridgewells.gov.uk

Area: Kent    South East

Grandmaster Flash To Hit The Decks In Rochester – 9th November 2012

Hip-hop pioneer, Grandmaster Flash, is set to hit the decks in Rochester High Street on 9th November, at the Casino Rooms. The era-defining icon created the loop and cross-fade DJ techniques, spinning minds and decks across the globe in the 70s and 80s. Scratch the surface of hip-hop and experimental rock of the past 35 years and the Furious Five godfather is at the heart of it.

It’s rare to be able to witness a legend at work, and even rarer to do so at just £12 a ticket. But that’s the small price to pay to see the man who was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2007 and stoked the musical fires of greats including Run DMC, Public Enemy, Beck and Jay Z. Grandmaster Flash was also the first person to use the turntable as an instrument. 

Since launching in September 2011, with a headline gig by prog-rock and Can icon Damo Suzuki, Medway-based TEA Concerts has focused on bringing to the towns artists that are shaping the current musical underground. In a short ten months they’ve put on bands on the up that knock the knees of indie darlings, including: Tigercats, Stuart Turner, The Bobby McGee’s and Darren Hayman; BBC 6 Music A-listers one and all.

To book tickets for Grandmaster Flash visit seetickets.com or teaconcerts.co.uk Tickets will be available from 9am on Friday 3 August and cost £12 in advance. This is a late concert style event in the main upstairs room with Re:fried DJs spinning tunes before and after the main act.

TEA background

TEA put on shows in Medway, London and Brighton

• Aim to put on new or era defining acts in interesting spaces

• Formed in 2011 from the now defunct MILK

• Former acts include Jeffrey Lewis, The Mae Shi, Damo Suzuki, TEETH!!!, Sister Mantos, Com Truise, The Bobby McGees, Seafood, Blackbird Blackbird, Mystery Jets, Darren Hayman, Euros Childs, UpCDownC, BITCHES, Moustache of Insanity, Honey Ride Me A Goat, Let Our Enemies Beware, and Trash Kit.

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Splashing In The Sea – By George Langridge

Last week I found myself in Menorca, well I say found, I mean went on a family holiday, where I spent ages taking photographs.

Soaking Up The Sights

I spent a good while flicking through the folder before actually being able to decide on ten photographs, so here are three of those.

I started with this photograph because it is that classic/vintage European bicycle and small street combination. I thought this almost represented the entire set of photographs. Just before I took this, a little old Menorcan woman got off of this bike and walked in to the bakery opposite. For this photograph I thought the rule of thirds needed to be followed here as to not give an ‘over importance’ to the bicycle. When I imported this in to Lightroom I think I made around six or seven virtual copies and spent an entire afternoon just playing with them.

On the north coast of Menorca there is a small fishing village named Fornells, here the coast-line is very rocky and can be a little rough at times. After about five or so minutes of burst shooting I finally got a decent breaker shot. I thought it was stunning, especially relative to the coast two or three miles along where it is complete calm. In Lightroom I didn’t actually have that much that needed to be done to make this remarkable photograph. I think all I did was pop the vibrancy, drop the highlights and add some contrast whilst crushing the blacks ever so slightly.

This photograph was taken in Cuitedella, the old capital city, which was the most traditional Menorcan/Spanish city/town that we had come across. It is safe to say that I had an absolute treat of a day here, with its purposely narrow streets and hidden shops and large houses. This photograph in particular I wish I had spent longer composing the shot and maybe coming out from 24mm to 18mm. As far as editing this photograph I think all I did was fiddle with the shadows and vibrancy.

I am always excited to hear feedback from anyone.

Please check out my Flickr -where you can find more of the photographs from my recent trip- and enjoy.

Select pieces of my work are available to purchase on Redbubble, please check it out. I do vary which photographs are available at different times during the year. If there is a specific image you would like to purchase, drop me an email: georgelangridge95@gmail.com

Follow me on Twitter/Instagram: @georgelangridge

Remember to enter the ‘Creatabot Creatives Competition

Crafty People Wanted For New Craft Market In Rochester

A new craft market is being planned for Rochester and the organisers – Craftybunch – are looking for people to sell their lovely creations there. Leigh from Craftybunch says “I would love to bring a Greenwich style market to the area for a Sunday afternoon once a month. I noticed how arty Medway is and want to provide an event to cater for the expanding creativity”.

If you are interested in selling your creations in Rochester please contact Leigh through craftybunch@live.co.uk

Twitter @craftybunch

www.craftybunch.wordpress.com
www.facebook.com/craftybunch

Area – South East

Creatabot Conversations: Music – 25th July 2012 – Rochester

What turned out to be an invite to a few people to come to coFWD to see the space has turned into something much more interesting. There are now a number of people coming to coFWD on Wednesday to have a look at the space – and they all have one thing in common – making music. 

Having spoken to various people recently about possibilities and needs in Kent, Medway is quickly becoming a place bubbling with inspiration and like minds who want to create and collaborate. 

If you would love to meet other musical creatives and discuss where there are needs and also help others find out about things they maybe didn’t know, then we would love to see you Wednesday: to indeed see coFWD but also to have a nice relaxed (emphasis on RELAXED) afternoon to chat about creativity, collaboration and ideas.

We would love there to be a wide mix of people attend such as:

Songwriters
Singers
Musicians
Photographers
Gig organisers
Music Video Producers
Record Labels
Social Media peeps
Web designers
Illustrators

Place – 161 Rochester High Street – ME1 1EH

Time – 3.00pm until 5.00pm

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/296198113812612/

For more details email: natasha@creatabot.co.uk

#creatabotconversations

Please note, our venue (http://coFWD.org/) is a very old bank building that is being slowly shaped by a community of individuals for long-term Community Interest. Sadly the startup project is in its infancy and being run on limited funds so the building currently has some accessibility issues. If you have specific access or disability requirements and would like to attend an event or activity please let us know at least 5 days before the event date so that we can do our utmost to resolve any potential problems to accommodate.”

This reason for the above is two fold:

1. by law we (coFWD/161/CreativeMedwayCiC) are required to make any ‘publicly promoted’ events or activity accessible to all and failure to be ‘accessible’ or not provide advanced notice of building/space accessibility limitations will likely land us in trouble.

2. it is very important that all of our events are measured for capacity and that we know who is coming to or has been through our doors, this is important for safety and security, and it also means the person running such activities can easily update participants of any changes or additional correspondence.

Area: South East

Introducing A New Creatabot Contributor – Kael Braham

Another contributor, woo! And from a different creative angle again. Kael, from Kent, spends most of his creative time acting and making music so will be bringing this interest into his articles. Here is a lovely mini interview so that you can find out more about him:

So Kael, what is your creative background?

I have Studied both media and drama at college.

What made you decide to concentrate on acting?

I tried my hand at everything creative I could, but acting was the one thing that made me think “this is what I want to do”.

Who inspires you both locally and universally? 

I have yet to find local inspiration but  if I had to pick one it would have to be my mum because she has always supported me through anything I have ever wanted to pursue. Universally I would have to say music as a whole inspires me.

Who would you love to work with?

The people I have done acting with have all been friends and people I know, and I actually enjoy working with them most. I know that if I try my best they will do the same and we can all work together.

Are there any other creative subjects you would love to learn?

I have always wanted to be in a band, and I was in one in the past. It was a lot of fun but I didn’t like the music we were making so I would love to be in a band where I truly loved the music we are creating and the style as a whole.

What would you like to achieve in the future?

I would like to get more notice as an actor and I would also like to be in a band again because those are two main things I love doing.

Can you recommend a creative website you love?

TeamFourStar.net

You can follow Kael on Twitter at @kaelbraham

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East    South West    Wales   West Midlands

Jonathan Livingstone Seagull Inspired Art Exhibition – UCA Pop Up Gallery – Chatham – 14th to 28th July 2012

The UCA pop up gallery in Chatham has a new exhibition between the 14th and 28th of July. The exhibition is inspired by the book “Jonathan Livingstone Seagull” by Richard Bach. The story follows the tale of how a seagull becomes tired of his seagull friends who continuously squabble over food and decides to instead concentrate on his flying skills. As a result he is outcast by the other seagulls and becomes a loner. He soon finds though that his brave, rebellious move has made his life more worthwhile and embarks on a whole new journey in his life.

 The artists exhibiting work inspired by the novel include Adam Piper, Sarah Wright, Kyveli Anastassiadi, Christine Hall, Alan Monk, Carolyn Birchall, Clair Archer, David Bradley, Eleanor Macfarlane, Layla Moore, and Richard Curtis. Natasha Steer is also exhibiting her unique interactive piece entitled “To Be Carried Out”. The canvas contains over 30 positive quotes from various historical figures including Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein and Henry Ford. The quotes are written onto cards signed by Natasha which can be taken away to keep, but if so must be replaced by another positive thought.

The UCA pop up gallery is in the upper level of the Pentagon shopping centre, Chatham.

Area: South East

Introducing A New Creatabot Contributor – Jane Ayres

Jane Ayres is a writer from Maidstone, Kent, who has just joined us as a valuable contributor. We thought you would like to know some more about Jane so asked some questions about her background and what inspires her…

So what is your creative background?

I’ve always enjoyed writing stories and had my first piece published in a national magazine when I was just fourteen.  I played piano from age seven, later trained to be a professional singer, and did my BA (Hons) in Music with Cultural and Community Studies at Sussex University in the 1980s. But the writing has been the one constant for me, and over the past 37 years my thirty novels have been translated into 7 languages and I’ve had hundreds of short stories, poems and articles in print.  In January this year, I finally started a blog http://www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk/

What other career paths have you taken?

Several!  I have a marketing diploma and a teaching certificate and after working in the sales department of a major publisher after graduating, I spent the last 25 years working in further and higher education, in marketing, outreach and also some teaching (music, dance, media and creative writing). I also set up and ran a mentoring programme for people wanting to work in the creative industries.

Who inspires you both locally and universally?

People who combine compassion and tenacity to change the world for the better.

What would you like to achieve in the future?

To use my writing as a tool to raise funds for a number of charities.

Can you recommend a creative website you love?  

I’m a fan of http://www.ifbook.co.uk/ which is at the forefront of the debate about the future of reading and writing, as well as Joel Friedlander’s brilliant http://www.thebookdesigner.com/ which generously shares his wealth of knowledge and experience to help writers publish their work using the amazing opportunities that the digital future offers.

To find out more about Jane please visit http://www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk/

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East    South West    Wales   West Midlands

Fabrica’s Newest Exhibition and Events – Cluster – Brighton – Ends 27th August 2012

Courtesy of Annemarie O’Sullivan

Fabrica is delighted to be working with Annemarie O’Sullivan, a UK basket maker to present Cluster, a new site-specific commission for the gallery.

A basket maker whose work ranges from small-scale domestic objects through to larger-scale woven forms, O’Sullivan mainly makes her constructions outdoors.  From her base in Lewes, East Sussex, she draws inspiration from the undulating South Downs landscape and from the theme of shelter.

For Cluster she says she started to think about “how people, creatures, and trees gather together. How we cluster together for protection and how, if needs be, we can become invisible in a group.”

Coinciding with the 10th anniversary of the iconic Sussex gridshell structures at The Weald and Downland Museum and The Woodland Enterprise Centre at Flimwell, O’Sullivan has drawn inspiration from the two buildings to produce a site-specific sculptural installation of elegant, organic beauty.

Cluster is a large-scale installation comprising a series of woven sculptures that allow the visitor to move in and around them. The work, combined with the architecture of the building, create both a social space in which to gather and play and a space of quiet contemplation.

Cluster was developed from an original proposal by Oliver Lowenstein, editor of Fourth Door Review, the structures have been made using finger-jointed sweet chestnut supplied by Inwood  Developments Ltd. www.in-wood.co.uk

Opening times

7-29 July, Wed-Sat 12-5pm and Sunday 2-5pm
1-27 Aug Wed-Sat 12-5pm, Sunday 2-5pm, late openings on Thursdays until 7pm and Bank Holiday Monday 12-5pm.

40 Duke Street, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 1AG

01273 778 646

EVENTS IN RELATION TO EXHIBITION

FABRICA-Artist Talk – Annemarie O’Sullivan Thursday 12 July 6.30-7.30pmAnnemarie will give an overview of her practice talk about her ideas and offer an insight into the development of Cluster. www.annemarieosullivan.co.uk

FABRICA-Basketry Workshop Friday 13 July 10-12.30pm – advance booking essential Led by Annemarie O’Sullivan (maximum 10 people). Explore simple basketry and knotting techniques, using flat band cane and harvested leaves. Find out about materials that you can harvest yourself to make baskets. Make a small vessel or a set of samples to take home.

FABRICA-Chaotic Cornucopia – an intense drawing experience Monday 16 July 12 -3pm – materials provided – £3.50 – advance booking essential A rare opportunity to spend three hours focused on drawing an abundant bundle of objects specially selected to compliment the summer show ‘Cluster’. In a calm and meditative atmosphere you are invited to lose yourself in the sensuous world of line and texture. Facilitated by artist Jane Fordham.www.smudgingandscratching.blogspot.com

 FABRICA-Rush Basketry Workshop Wednesday 18 and 25 July 10-12.30pm – advance booking essential. Led by Ruby Taylor (maximum 10 places). Inspired by archaeological finds dating back 5,000 years, learn the ancient technique of twining to make a small basketry pouch for modern-day usage: perhaps to hold your I-pod or mobile phone, where our ancestors used a similar basketry pouch to carry flint tools. Suitable for all levels including beginners.www.facebook.com/native.hands.uk

 FABRICA-Lunchtime lecture Wednesday 18 July 1.30-2.30pm

Ian Dunford from East Sussex Archaeology and Museums Partnership. Where we come from and how we lived. How did our ancestors build their homes? The East Sussex Archaeology and Museums Partnership team looks at some of the ways our ancestors constructed their homes from local materials and reveals how they use house building projects based on archaeological evidence to help contemporary communities discover our common heritage. www.esamp.com

 Visit to the Woodland Enterprise Centre, Flimwell, East Sussex Thursday 19 July 10am-4pm – advance booking essential (includes travel times to and from Fabrica). Get a behind the scenes view, explore the Gridshell building and explore the woodland to see sweet chestnuts growing, the sustainable timber used in this exhibition, with a tour led by David Saunders, forester and founder of Woodnet.  www.woodnet.org.uk

 FABRICA-Artist Story – Susan Collis Thursday 19 July 6.30-7.30pm Susan Collis is a contemporary artist who lives and works in the UK. Her practice combines a drawing process with installation and sculpture – often creating environments that at first confuse and then delight the viewer. Her work is held in many prestigious collections and she has recently completed solo exhibitions in galleries in Austin Texas, London, Paris and Spain. She will present an insight into the development of her practice to date. www.seventeengallery.com

 Visit to the Weald and Downland Museum Tuesday 31 July 10am-4pm, FreeFabrica will provide transport and a picnic. Get a behind the scenes glimpse of how the Downland Gridshell was built as well as a guided tour of the rest of the Museum.www.wealddown.co.uk

 Advance booking recommended for all events: info@fabrica.org.uk Call Fabrica on 01273 778646 www.fabrica.org.uk


Visit www.fabrica.org.uk for more details.

Area: South East

London Design Festival 2012 – Craft Central Events – 17th to 25th September

Celebrating the diversity of UK contemporary craft and design, Craft Central brings you 3 intriguing events for the London Design Festival:

One Day Designers Sale: Interior Products

Date: Monday 17 Sept 2012, 12noon – 7pm

Venue: Craft Central, 33-35 St John’s Square, London EC1M 4DS

FREE ADMISSION

Treat your home! Distinctive contemporary craft for the home at discount prices. The One Day Designers Sale is back… but think bigger, better and bolder for London Design Festival 2012. For one day only, find distinctive contemporary craft for the home by over 30 UK designers cherry picked to help spruce up your pad!

Delve through the tempting interior products on sale, including: Design K’s vibrant furniture; Charlene Mullen’s unmistakable cushions; IKUKO Iwamoto’s intricate ceramics; Loughlion Design’s ingenious kitchen solutions; and Kate Clarke’s colourful homeware to brighten any kitchen. Celebrate London and bring the city indoors with London Kills Me’s distinctive prints and Michelle Mason’s famous cushions.

Lighten up with HAM’s quirky ‘hammade’ printed products; Sarah Bonallo’s inventive upholstery; Namiko Murakoshi’s adorable Hairy Babes ceramics; Haidee Drew’s playful interior products; and bring a smile to breakfast time with Takae Mizutani’s My Egg & Soldiers tableware.

As well as sneak previews of exciting new work, snap up bargains from previous collections. Make the most of the extraordinary discounts on offer (with selected items up to 50% off retail prices) and make your house the envy of the street!

This exceptional shopping treat is topped off by meeting the maker in person – come and meet…

Alice Bree, Alison Brent, DesignK, Charlene Mullen, Chris Edwards, Daniel Spring, Deryn Relph, Gina Pierce Design, Haidée Drew, Helen Foot Design, Henna Craft, IKUKO Iwamoto Ceramics, Jane Sleator Ceramics, Jayna’s Designs, Scamp Baby Gifts, HAM, kate clarke London, The Intricate Project, Linda Gifford, Lok Ming Fung Ceramics, RALLI Design, martin Horgan, Suitcase Susie, Michelle Mason, Namiko Murakoshi, Nancy Straughan Printed Textiles, LondonKillsMe, Loughlion Design, Chairs By Sarah Bonallo, Stewart Martin Johnson, Takae Mizutani, Tina Vlassopulos, and Tracey Bush.

More details at  http://www.craftcentral.org.uk/september-sale

 

Inspired by London

Dates: 18-23 Sept 2012

Opening times: http://craftcentral.org.uk/calendar

Venue: The Showcase, Craft Central, 33-35 St John’s Square, London EC1M 4DS

FREE ADMISSION

Collective exhibition by seven London based designers. United in their passion for all things London, an eclectic group of 7 designer makers join forces for the London Design Festival. This London themed exhibition will showcase the diversity of art, fashion, interior products and jewellery inspired by our capital.

Exhibitors include:

Bronagh Kennedy – Distinctive limited edition digital prints inspired by London’s landmark buildings.

London Kills Me – Prints, cards, wall hangings and interior textiles inspired by the history and architecture of London and its changing urban landscape, using traditional artisan printing methods.

Vic Lee – Limited edition screen prints of London’s neighbourhoods and streetscapes.

Rosemary Lucas – River Thames themed contemporary jewellery, including sterling silver cuffs.

Michelle Mason – Interior products inspired by London’s bus destinations, its skyline, landmarks and iconic transport. Sarah Eyton –

Bold fashion accessories, including cuffs depicting London’s skyline.

Amy Keeper – A new collection of contemporary jewellery inspired by vintage London market traders tokens from Smithfield and Spitalfields Markets.

 

Rob Braybrooks – Exhibition

Dates: 17-23 Sept 2012

 Opening times: http://craftcentral.org.uk/calendar

Venue: The Corner Shop
Craft Central, 21 Clerkenwell Green, EC1R 0DX

FREE ADMISSION

Designer maker, Rob Braybrooks brings a slice of Cornwall to Clerkenwell for the London Design Festival with his hand cut wood relief wall hung designs and art pieces.

Inspired by the back-lit silhouettes and lines created in natural and urban landscapes, he produces delicate light birch wood hand cut relief upon dark painted frame boards. 

 

About Craft Central

www.craftcentral.org.uk

At the cutting edge of craft for 30 years, Craft Central (CC) is an oasis in the city – actively promoting, nurturing and strengthening the future of UK craft and design. Designer makers flourish through insightful support, affordable studio spaces, accessible exhibition facilities and valuable opportunities. We understand designer makers, connecting over 600 through our growing dynamic national Network. We build relationships within our creative community and reach out to diverse audiences. CC is a destination for innovative craft and design, showcasing stimulating exhibitions, talks and ‘meet the maker’ experiences. 

Area: London  South East

Wild Whispers: The Diary of a Filmmaker – Episode 1

It dawned on my fairly recently what a long hard struggle it is being an independent artist, possible more so being an independent filmmaker.  I thought, if only I REALLY knew what it was like in the world of filmmaking would I have done things differently?  I’m not sure.   In these articles I will document how things are in the indie film world.  I plan to shoot a feature next summer.  Will it happen?  HOW will it happen?  Well, dear reader, with any luck you shall be privy to the process, the ups and downs, the ins and out, the triumph and despair of such ventures.

I first decided I wanted to become a filmmaker when I was at college.  For a while before that I knew that I didn’t quite think in the same way as my peers.  I think I wanted to be a pop star but not playing an instrument, being able to write a song or even hold a tune put paid to that.  Then I saw a few films that left a mark on me.  I saw how film was going to become my form of expression.  It was more than that though.  It wasn’t just about telling a story, it was about creating a FEELING.  Even now, I’m not interested in art that just tells stories or in art for art’s sake.  I need to discover a FEELING.  I think that’s it, my overriding desire as a filmmaker is to create a feeling in films.  That’s the only way I can explain it, at least for now.

My first thoughts were ‘how will I make it in this industry?’  A mistaken thought.  There is no film ‘industry’.  Hasn’t been for a long time.  Not in the UK anyway.  Eventually I realised that there are creative people who work on films and filmmakers who create films from the bottom to the top.  I realised, after a brief flirtation in the erm, ‘industry’ that it was the latter camp I fell into.  So from now on it was a case of working full time to pay the bills but filmmaking was always my REAL career.

And that’s when the dawn hit me.  I was an outsider.  My role was to pull various fragments together from inside my head and from the real word to make things happen.    Years of hard work, years of working as an outsider to, well, pretty much everything.  The long slog.  This is a potted history, I will reveal more about these films, and the process of making them, over time.  First up, I made a few short films with varying degrees of success.  No funding, just using what was available to me.  Even back then it became fairly clear to me that public funding was a tricky issue.  I don’t have anything against public funding at all.  It is fairly obvious that it’s a deeply flawed system though.  Still, that’s a discussion for another day.

After a while it dawned on me that I needed to make a feature film.  Public funding simply wouldn’t be forthcoming for what I wanted to do so I set off to the Arctic to make a documentary about life up there.  How does that work?  Well, I volunteered for a charity and that effectively paid for my film.  The in-kind budget was around 10,000UKP.  Naturally, as is the way being an indie, I did the project for free.  Which was fair enough, of course, nobody asked me to do it.  It was my own project.  The film took some time to edit but ‘East 3 – Exploring a Frozen Frontier’ premiered in New York in 2007, went onto play in Chicago, toured the UK and then screened on UK television.  I was even interviewed about it on BBC Newsroom South East.

A few more short films followed (by now I was getting better at promoting them and they were all broadcast on UK TV).  The method and philosophy remained the same, shoot with what I had to hand, create a feeling.  This year I realised I had gone as far as I could with my old short films and so packaged them up into a compilation DVD ‘Caged Fire – The Short Films of Mr Young’  It felt right to say goodbye to these films as I now need to focus on a new set of objectives.  Yes, more short films but a feature film too.

Now, we come too making the second feature.  This time, a narrative film.  The question is, ‘how does one get from where I am now to making a feature length story?’  Will it even work out?  I have no idea.  Not yet.   I guess this diary will reveal all.

So, would I have done things differently?  I doubt it.  It’s very hard but also very rewarding when you follow your own path.  Right now the only genuine path for the independent filmmaker is the one you make yourself.  It’s a wild path with only whispers in the wind to help.  With any luck though I might see some paths that have been cleared already and I certainly hope, with the wise and not so wise words in this diary, I may just clear a path or two for you.

You can buy both  ’East 3 – Exploring a Frozen Frontier’ and ‘Caged Fire – The Short Films of Mr Young’ here:

www.themoontheeye.co.uk/onlinestore

Mr Young

Independent Filmmaker

www.themoontheeye.co.uk

www.facebook.com/themoontheeye

www.twitter.com/Mr_Young

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East                South West    Wales   West Midlands  

Garden Adventures – By George Langridge

This week I found myself a little busy with coursework, however I decided I would see what I could find in the garden. I was actually surprised at how pretty some of the things -that I take for granted- in the garden are.

Gardening, It’s Not For Me

I started out looking -with distracting hay fever- for little insects and quirks. This is what I found.

Green Bug

As soon as I stepped out of the door I noticed this little insect on the bush next to the window. I took this picture from about three or four different angles but decided to stick with this one as it is almost at eye level (from creatures perspective, as I’m not 2ft tall). I like this photograph because even though this insect is the same colour as the leaf the contrast -pumped in post- really makes it stand out. I also like the way it is a captured moment in this creature’s life.

Little Figure

Although this photograph isn’t artsy or particularly impressive in any way, I do like it. This is because it is actually cutely hidden in the garden, also it is fairly cute. In post-production I pumped the clarity and popped the blacks to add a bit of ‘pow’ to what was a terribly bland photograph.

Pretty Hidden Flower

I decided that I would look around the back of the bushes and in obscure places. I then found this flower and was amazed that the dog hadn’t yet chewed on it. I was tempted to make this black and white but then because it was sunny in the garden – I was sat on the bench editing- I thought it just had to be vibrant. As I gain experience with a DSLR I continue to be amazed at what my little 18-55mm -f/3.5- kit lens can actually do. I guess I am still amazed by depth of field.

To see the full resolution images and my other photographs check out my Flickr.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/georgelangridge/

I am currently looking for people willing to allow me photograph them candid. This would entail them doing what they do -ie. Working in a workshop/studio/kitchen- and have me photographing them doing it. If you would be willing to do this or model for portraits get in touch with me at georgelangridge95@gmail.com or on twitter @georgelangridge .

Twitter/Instagram: @georgelangridge

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East     South West    Wales   West Midlands

Hoodwink – The Art Project For Non Traditional Space – Open For Proposals – Ends 22nd July 2012


Hoodwink is a unique commissioning project initiated by Tunbridge Wells Borough Council Arts Development Unit that extends contemporary art practice beyond gallery spaces and public art arenas and places it slap bang in the middle of the hustle and bustle of daily life, such as in supermarkets, pubs and shopping centres, harnessing the potential for large-scale engagement with existing users.

Hoodwink is calling for proposals from artists working in the UK to make a site-specific response to an independent music venue, The Forum in Tunbridge Wells. The commission, worth £7000, represents an exciting opportunity for the artist involved to work in new ways and reach new audiences by showing in a non-traditional space and to make new connections with Kent physically and theoretically.

They have organised 2 open sessions to view the venue, talk to staff and Hoodwink project managers on 2nd July and 3rd July.

For more details and to download a brief go to: http://www2.tunbridgewells.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=4857

Contact by emailing: hoodwink@tunbridgewells.gov.uk

Connect on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/groups/396956693682730/

Area: South East  London

Art Odds and Art Sods – All Work Under £50 – Group Exhibition at Deaf Cat Coffee Bar – Rochester – 25th June to 15th July 2012

Art Odds and Art Sods is a group show at The Deaf Cat Coffee Bar, Rochester, featuring prints, paintings, books, photographs, jewellery and hats from:

Wolf Howard
Matthew Bray
Jim Hill
Sara Norling
Rikard Osterlund
Darrell Hawkins
Bjorn Veno
Zara Carpenter

ALL WORK UNDER £50!! A great way to start collecting art!

From 25th June -15th July (10.00am-5.00pm)

Deaf Cat Coffee Bar

83 High Street

Rochester

Kent

Area: South East

A Medway Vision Special – Why Medway Needs a Film Festival

Yes, I know.  I’m a filmmaker.  It’d be strange if I DIDN’T want a film festival in Medway.  But the fact is, Medway needs a film festival and what’s more there are some very pertinent reasons why:

1/  Strategy – One of Medway council’s priorities is to harness the creative industries to bring cash and other nice things into the area.  What better way to do that than to set-up a festival that draws punters in and gets them drinking and eating in local venues?  Good for creativity, good for the local economy.

2/  Skills sharing – It’s not just about money either.  It’s about building confidence, skills, pride and hearing voices.  Local people from all walks of life can get involved, from the volunteers who help set it up to the local talent who can display their hard work.  Alongside this, local and not so local filmmakers can share skills with a variety of local communities in order to develop voices, to develop the Medway story, if you will.

3/   Special times, special measures – As I have been arguing in these articles, Medway is in a special place artistically right now.  This needs to be capitalised on.  Film festivals mean creative guests, means more networking, means more creativity.  It’s a win, win situation.

4/  Prestige – Most self-respecting places the size of Medway have film festivals.  And I believe we are more creative than most.  Many of these festivals start off small, some even remain small.  But the point is, knowing your town will be hosting a selection of the best moving pictures from around the world AND running them side by side with local work that’s equally as effecting can only be a good thing.

5/  Promoting and watching film – I don’t mean the standard Odeon fare.  That’s easy to see.  Just go to the Odeon or pop the tele on if that’s your bag.  I mean the more leftfield stuff, the challenging films that build from the film festivals to become important pieces of cinema.  Surely we want to be part of that?  Surely we want access to films not available at the cinema chains?

6/  Education – What better way to convince the next generation, or even this generation of film fans, that there is more to life than chain cinema films?  Independent features, international documentaries, short films, music videos…you can almost taste the excitement can’t you?

7/ It’s already started – Yeah, I couldn’t resist.  I’ve already set up the webpage www.medwayvisions.tumblr.com in the hope that the creative people of Medway come on board and that the audience will be willing to come and watch.  My film company The Moon The Eye will run the show but I can’t do it on my own.  Heck, I wouldn’t even want to try.  It needs people, organisations on board to lend a hand in whatever way they know how.  Yes, it NEEDS you.  It’s here, but it will only work if we ALL get involved.

So, who’s with me?

.

Mr Young

Independent Filmmaker

www.themoontheeye.co.uk

www.twitter.com/Mr_Young

www.facebook.com/themoontheeye

Mr Young