Strood Robots And Other Medway Stories – Art Exhibition – Nucleus Arts Gallery Chatham – 16th to 28th February 2013

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Myths and Legends of the Medway Towns from BAN THE MIND READER, to the Walderslade Sprite, plus more pragmatic tales from modern Medway.

Artwork will be exhibited by peninsular exiles Shaun Hutchings and Sharon Cooper. Sharon has produced images of the Medway Towns sown on to canvases, whilst Shaun Hutchings paints pictures from his imagination, often in abstract form. Many are set in a ‘magical’ or ‘mythical’ future Medway.

The Exhibition runs from the 16th to the 28th of February.

Location: Nucleus studios and Gallery, Chatham – www.nucleus-arts.com/page3.htm

George RW Cutts – Archive from 1980 – Exhibition – 15th to 20th February 2013 – Margate

Typewriter Copperbox

A show of over 100 new drawings from George RW Cutts, featuring abandoned towns, Antarctic explorers, ACME whistles, badges, birds, brogues, buttons, clay pipes, clocks, coins, cycling jerseys, Delph tiles, desert boots, dogs, door bells, forgotten Olympians, hot dog carts, Margate, medals, mermaids, monkey paisley, pétanque, trophies, tuk-tuks, and typewriters.

The exhibition includes, The Margate Postcards, a new series of 30 blue monochrome postcards inspired by Margate past and present.

Every visitor can enter a draw to win a piece of work featured in the show.

Parade is an artist led space, 2 minutes along the sea front from the Turner Contemporary.

What:George RW Cutts, Archive from 1980
Where:Parade, Marine Drive, Margate, Kent CT9 1DH

When: Fri 15 Feb – Wed 20 Feb, 11am-5pm daily
Further Details: www.archivefrom1980.com

Contact: georgerwcutts@archivefrom1980.com

Badges 1989

Area: South East     Kent

Call For Traders For New Outdoor Market In Chatham! – Sun Wharf Market – Sunday 24th March

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Pitches are available to take part in the first Sun Wharf Market, a new quarterly outdoor market in Chatham.

The market is new for 2013 and pitches are available for a variety of makers. The first Sun Wharf Market will be held on Sunday 24 March in the Sun Wharf car park, Medway Street in Chatham.

 Market organiser and local resident Heather Burgess, 27, hopes to create a complimenting combination of stalls including art, craft, local produce, jewellery, fashion, antiques, vintage and collectibles. Limited pitches are available now for £15 each, trading hours will be 10am – 4pm. To avoid disappointment early applications are recommended, closing date for all applications is Monday 4 March 2013. All enquiries should contact Heather by emailing heather.sunpierhouse@gmail.com

Area:    South East    Medway   Kent

Creative Minds Literary Potlatch – A Feast of Inspiration – 23rd March 2013 – Strood

Creative Minds Literary Potlatch - A Feast of Inspiration - 23rd March 2013 - Strood

Creative Minds Literary Potlatch. Interested in art and creativity? Feeling a little stuck? Come and mingle with like-minded individuals and share coffee and ideas. Open to everyone interested in creativity, if you’re a beginner or someone more advanced.

Activities planned include; speed debating, Parashare; bring a paragraph to share from a favourite book or your own writing, and other writers games.

This event is part of the Other worlds, other voices Rochester literature festival.

Saturday, 23 March 10am – 12 noon Strood library

Book your free place by calling 01634 335890 or just turn up on the day!

Craft Central Gets Hitched – London’s Handmade Wedding Fair – 21st to 24th March 2013

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Wedding coming up? Fed up of sprawling soulless commercial wedding fairs? Get personal at Craft Central 21-24 March 2013! All you need to add a handmade touch to the big day. From the bride herself to guests looking for the ideal gift, there’s something for everyone… and, what’s more, IT’S FREE!

Join Craft Central for a drink at the Special Launch Night on Thurs 21 March, 4-8pm Late Night Shopping on Fri 22 March, 4-8pm

Avoid the high street on Sat 23 March, 11am-5pm & Sun 24 March, 12-4pm

LOCATION: 33-35 St John’s Square, London EC1M 4DS

http://craftcentral.org.uk/craft-central-gets-hitched

More Info from Craft Central

Craft Central Gets Hitched returns for 2013… Give your wedding some character with unique, handmade products by almost 50 designer makers. Browse ready to buy products, commission your own piece or discover a bespoke service. Our designers are as excited as you are about your big day (well, almost!) so come and meet them!

We’ll help tackle those long wedding ‘to do’ lists! From ‘classic’ wedding essentials, to the slightly more unusual, handcrafted products include: Bridal fashion; Invitations; Millinery; Jewellery (rings in particular!); Gifts (such as Ceramics, Interior Products, Silversmithing); Father/Mother of Bride/Groom fashion and accessories; Bunting; Decorations; Floristry; Favours and table paraphernalia. Also, don’t miss hair and makeup demonstrations; scrumptious wedding cake solutions; music from DJs The Wedding Smashers; Rhapsody Road Photography’s pop up photo booth; gorgeous floristry by Flor Unikon and our wedding food market in St John’s Square.

It’s not only future brides and grooms who’ll appreciate Craft Central Gets Hitched. The entire guest list (from family and bridesmaids/groomsmen to the evening guests) will be thoroughly spoilt for choice…

For the Bride… Once the dress is sorted you can relax (well, it’s almost that simple!), so come and meet our couture bridal wear designers who will be showcasing stunning gowns. Not planning a traditional veil? Or fancy a unique headpiece to compliment the dream dress? We have an array of milliners with sumptuous vintage-inspired bridal hats and fascinators. Bespoke handmade shoes are the perfect finishing touch!

Don’t forget the Men… Our designers are on hand for all your wedding jewellery needs! Personalise wedding attire with handmade cufflinks and don’t forget the rings – you’ll find a super selection of wedding bands and engagement rings here!

The look and feel of the day… With beautifully designed invitations, bespoke bunting, favours and table decorations – we’re here to help!

The perfect wedding gift… There’ll be plenty of handmade options, including ceramics, silver smithing and other tempting products for the home.

The wedding party… Seeking a special gift to thank your bridesmaids? Our jewellery and accessories designers can provide affordable options.

Last but not least, the Mother of the Bride… With exceptional milliners on board, the fear of someone sporting the same hat as you becomes a thing of the past.

Almost 50 designers will be cherry picked to assist with your big day.

Area: UK   Britain   South East     London

Call for Artists! Registration is open for Medway Open Studios and Arts Festival – 13 – 21 July 2013

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Medway Open Studios and Arts Festival is a community arts festival celebrating the wealth of creativity in Medway. Now in its second year, applications are open to all Medway based artists to take part this summer.

The festival will take place from Saturday 13 to Sunday 21 July 2013 across the Medway towns, and promises to include work from a variety of art forms. Jewellery, sculpture, print, paint, and photography are all popular examples of work created in Medway that will be exhibited during the Festival. 16 venues and over 70 local artists took part in the first year of the festival in July 2012, many will be opening their doors again and inviting visitors to see their work and learn more about their craft.

Apply early and benefit from a reduced application fee. Applications received before 1 February will get 20% off. If you miss this deadline but apply between 1 February and 8 March there is a 10% discount. The final closing date for all applications is 26 April.

Full details about the Festival and how to apply can be found on the Festival website – www.medwayopenstudios.co.uk.

Area: South East    Kent    London

Cake International – 12th to 14th April 2013 – London

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Has your secret passion for pastry or craze for cake decorating taken over your day to day life? If the answer is yes, then Cake International – The Sugarcraft, Cake Decorating & Baking Show at ExCeL, London from 12-14 April is just the ticket. Celebrity bakers and TV personalities Paul Hollywood, Mary Berry and 2012’s winner John Waite will be opening and appearing at the show and meeting their thousands of fans in a question and answer session. As well as this, visitors to the show can discover their top tips and baking inspirations in the Bakery Theatre at the show.

Other features include over 80 exhibitors from across the globe offering cutting-edge cake decorating and baking supplies; Competition Classes for all ages and abilities; two Demonstration Theatres with the greatest talents from the UK and abroad; Paul Da Costa Greaves taking centre stage in The Bakery Theatre; Tracey Mann showcasing her latest project, a giant cake construction of Life Under The Sea; A Taste of Sugar Workshops for newcomers to sugarcraft and much more! Please visit www.cakeinternational.co.uk for more information.

FACT FILE

Cake International – The Sugarcraft, Cake Decorating & Baking Show

ExCeL, London

12-14 April 2013

Ticket Prices:

Adult £14.00 (£12.00 Advance Price)

Senior £13.00 (£11.00 Advance Price)

2 Day Ticket (Advance Only) Adult £18.00 Senior £16.00

3 Day Ticket (Advance Only) Adult £25.00 Senior £23.00

Children free if accompanied by an adult with a valid ticket, otherwise £5.00

All advanced tickets need to be ordered by 5pm Mon 8 April

Book tickets online at www.ichf.co.uk or phone the Ticket Hotline on 01425 277988.

Follow on Twitter @thecakeshows or find on Facebook – Cake International

Creative Stitches and Hobbycrafts – 4th to 6th April 2013 – London

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Embrace the handmade and personal trend that is sweeping the nation by visiting Creative Stitches Hobbycrafts taking place for the first time at the ExCeL, London from the 4-6 April.

With over 100 exhibitors offering the latest craft inspiration and advice; a selection of stunning Jane Austen costumes; Catwalk Fashion Shows; advice and top tips in the Sewing Hub and Knitting Parlour; a free programme of quick and easy workshops, talks, demonstrations and much more! To find out more details, please visit www.ichf.co.uk.

FACT FILE

Creative Stitches & Hobbycrafts

ExCeL, London

4-6 April 2013

Ticket Prices:

Adult £10.00 (£8.00 Advance Price)

Senior £9.00 (£7.00 Advance Price)

Children free if accompanied by an adult with a valid ticket, otherwise £5.00

All advanced tickets need to be ordered by 5pm Mon 1 April

For more information please visit www.ichf.co.uk. Book tickets online at www.ichf.co.uk or phone the Ticket Hotline on 01425 277988.

Follow on Twitter @ICHFUK or like on Facebook – ICHF Events

Area:         South East        London

Writing, therapy and positive outcomes by Jane Ayres

photo by Jane Ayres
photo by Jane Ayres

When I was younger, writing poetry which described and explored my state of mind during major depression may have saved me from a nervous breakdown.  Artists and writers can, and do,  use their art as a form of self-therapy. Reflective writing with a purpose, intentional or otherwise.

Writing is how I express myself.  I can struggle with words when I speak.  Writing everything down first provides the chance to ensure clarity.  I’ve been doing it all my life.  Fiction, non-fiction, copy-writing, blogging, emails, to do lists……So why am denying myself this proven therapeutic tool now? When I am still coming to terms with losing both my parents to pancreatic cancer in the space of 6 months. Burying the grief, the profound, deep sadness. The anger.  Why do I feel uncomfortable writing about it?

I don’t have children of my own.  Years ago, my maternal instincts found an outlet through caring for a special, adored young cat and when I lost him, I channelled my grief and helplessness into volunteering and fundraising for the Cats Protection League.  Eventually I was able to write about it. Over the past year, I’ve raised funds and tried to raise awareness of pancreatic cancer.  When I lose loved ones, I have a desperate need to find a positive outcome from all the tragedy.  It’s a useful way of focussing creative energy.

There is currently a high profile media campaign running which promotes the importance of cancer research.  What it doesn’t say is that not all cancers are equal.  To quote from the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund:

“Pancreatic cancer has the lowest survival rate of all cancers – just 3% of those diagnosed survive for five years. It is also the only cancer that has seen no improvement in this figure over the last 40 years.

Overall, half of all those diagnosed with a cancer now survive for five years or more. For many cancers, five year survival rates have increased hugely since the 1970s. For breast cancer – where large amounts have been spent on research – five year survival rates have increased from 50% to 80%.

Yet despite its high death rate and lack of improvement in chances of survival, pancreatic cancer attracts little research funding in comparison with many other cancers.”

Although I’m not yet ready to write about my feelings,   I’m glad that I can use what I write as a tool to raise awareness of issues that concern me which relate to my bereavement.  So if this results in even one reader making a donation to, or getting involved with, these charities, then the words have done their job.

Links:  http://pancreaticcanceraction.org/    http://www.pcrf.org.uk/

On therapeutic writing:  http://www.lapidus.org.uk/about.php

Jane’s recent e-book, Coming Home, is available from Amazon, with all author royalties going to the charity Cats Protection.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00AGZV9WM

www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk

Medway Photo Festival – January 11th to 15th 2013

Photo Fest 2013

The Medway Photo Festival happens once a year in January and takes place in Rochester and Chatham. The photography exhibitions will all be open during the third week of January. Exhibitions will feature exciting new work from students in their 2nd year studying Photography as Contemporary Practice at the UCA Rochester.

EXHIBITION DATES and INFO

Sin City
Private view 11th January, exhibition open 11th – 17th January
Address: Nucleus New Art Gallery Chatham, 272 Chatham High Street, ME4 4BP

Nyctophobia
Private view 14th January, exhibition open 14th – 18th January
Address: Nucleus Art Centre, 75 Rochester High Street

Repeat to Fade
Private view 14th January, exhibition open 14th – 18th January
Address: 66 Rochester High Street,  ME1 1JK

Eyedentity
Private view 14th January, exhibition open 14th – 18th January
Address: Singapora Lounge, 51 Rochester High Street, ME1 1LN

Suddenly No
Private view 14th January, exhibition open 14th January
Address: 161 Rochester High Street

Close Your Eyes
Private view 15th January, exhibition open 14th – 17h January
Address: Sun Pier House, Sun Wharf, Medway Street, ME4 4HF Chatham

Novo Aspect


Private view 15th January, exhibition open 16th – 18st January
Address: 86 High Street Chatham, 1st floor

Paramnesia


Private view 15th January, exhibition open 16th January
Address: The Brook Theater, Studio room, Old Town Hall, ME4 4SE

For more information please visit www.medwayphoto2013.tumblr.com 

Get Into The Creative Industries With Creative Industries Pathways Programme – Medway

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Icon Theatre in Medway are running a special programme for people who are looking to get into the creative industries. The programme offers anyone who is unemployed (working less than 15hrs/wk) or economically inactive (e.g. a stay at home mum, full-time carer) the chance to work one-on-one with a creative industries mentor, to go on short courses, and develop a professional portfolio in order to improve career prospects in any creative industry.

Icon Theatre are funded by the European Social Fund and welcome anyone who lives in the Medway area. There are certain criteria for the programme, but people are encouraged to get in touch as there are a wide range of projects planned that are suitable for many people.

To find out more please contact Katie Charlton –  katie@icontheatre.org.uk

www.icontheatre.org.uk

Area: Medway   Kent    South East

Ideas Tap Offering Student Loan Repayment – £9,000 Available! – Closing March 2013

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Saddled by student debt? Whether you’re a first-year student or a graduate, if you embarked on a BA or BMus in 2006* or later, you could benefit from having £9,000 wiped off your Student Loans Company balance by arts charity IdeasTap.

For a chance to win, simply explain to Ideas Tap  in 100 words or less what you could offer to IdeasTap’s network in exchange for the money. It could be an idea or a service, for example “This is how you could improve your site…” or “I’ll run this Spa event for your members…” ­ the more imaginative, original and feasible the idea, the better!

Find out more and apply by 29 March at www.ideastap.com/unifeefund

My Favourite Things – Free Creative Inspiration Event – 18th January 2013 – Rochester – PLUS Competition! Win a copy of Paintshop Pro X4

Favourite Things
“My Favourite Things” is an opportunity to discuss your favourite “things” to other people in a relaxed atmosphere over tea. Talk about things that inspire you, inspire others and build confidence in speaking in front of others so that you can express yourself better as a freelancer. For those that are shy please just come and listen and meet some other local creatives. If you are happy to present your favourite “thing” then just pick one “thing” and discuss it with others in the room. Be prepared for others to ask questions (you can always Google!)

Subjects could include books, films, music, art, food, animals, people…anything you love talking about. It is a free event, but we would appreciate if you book a ticket so we know how many people are coming!

You can book a FREE ticket here: www.favouritethings.eventbrite.com

The event will be held at:

161 High Street

Rochester

Kent

On the 18th January 2013 at 7.30pm

COMPETITION! Tell us what inspires you and why  – Our favourite answer will win a copy of Paintshop Pro X4 (for Windows)

Competition closes on the 1st February at 8pm.
Please note, our venue (http://coFWD.org/) is a very old bank building that is being slowly shaped by a community of individuals for long-term Community Interest. Sadly the startup project is in its infancy and being run on limited funds so the building currently has some accessibility issues. If you have specific access or disability requirements and would like to participate in an event or activity please let us know at least 5 days before the event date so that we can do our utmost to resolve any potential problems to accommodate.

Margate Based Marine Studios Launch Adventures in Comics Competition – deadline 25th January 2013

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Celebrating illustration, writing, making, sequential narrative, and all that is Comics, Margate-based Marine Studios has just announced the launch of its 2013 Adventures in Comics comic competition.

AIC3 is inviting UK-based creators to respond to their annual two-page-comic challenge. Simply create a 2-page-comic* in response to this year’s theme – The Great Tree.

All entries will be showcased in an exhibition and free printed publication in February 2013 and the winning entry will be judged by comics aficionado Paul Gravett.

To enter, send your 2-page-comic to:Kam@hkd.uk.com or RickAThkd.uk.com

The deadline for submissions: 25th January 2013

• Visit www.adventuresincomics.org to find out more. Previous AIC entries can be seen on our website and blog.

• Marine Studios Margate is at 17 Albert Terrace, Margate, Kent CT9 1UJ. Tel: 01843 282 219  info@marinestudios.co.uk. Web:marinestudios.co.uk

Creative Courses Being Offered For 2013 Through Canterbury Christ Church University

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Canterbury Christ Church University is offering the opportunity to study interesting creative subjects across its universities in Kent. Various short courses taking place during 2013 include the subjects of music, art and literature.

To take a look at the courses and to book please see the university website:

www.canterbury.ac.uk/community-arts-education/short-courses/spring-2013.asp

So What Exactly IS ‘Art’? – by James Bovington

(From Google)
(From Google)

I’ve been thinking about ‘art’ recently. It happens sometimes.

More specifically I’ve been trying to work out what ‘art’ is. Not necessarily ‘what is art?’ because that opens up the forum for people to claim a single house brick on a cushion is art. They’re very different questions, since one deals with individual pieces and asks ‘is this art?’ and the other questions the nature of the ephemeral wisps of nothing we happen to actually call ‘art’.

That is to say I’m questioning the aspect, not the components. Anyway;

A while ago I found a video on Youtube that made my heart sing. I posted a link to it on my Facebook with the addendum “If you ever, EVER feel the need to ask me what ‘art’ is;”

The video in question is here:

There’s something about that situation that is so beautiful that I don’t know where to put myself. I think part of that is the knowledge that for most of these people there really isn’t a real reason to be doing that, it’s just fun.

On a similar note; a few years ago there was a particularly cold winter and Times Square in New York City got quite a lot of snow in one evening. What erupted from that were not complaints and injury claims but a huge snowball fight. There were a number of photos posted online (you can find them with a quick Google of “Times Square snowball fight 2009”) and they showed a bunch of strangers lobbing frozen rain at each other. There was one particular photo (which I can’t seem to find now, despite my almost invincible Google-Fu. I wonder if that makes it more special.) of a young man, arm extended in mid- throw with a look of such joy on his face that it made me happy for days.

Is that art? I think it is. Not the photos themselves, but the act. A gigantic, spontaneous snowball fight in the middle of one of the busiest cities in the world is a beautiful thing, and to me ‘art’ is definitively “Anything Beautiful”. I’ve mentioned the only other definition of art I respect elsewhere on Creatabot. (Here, to be specific). To me, ‘art’ that exists only to annoy people isn’t art. If someone puts up a gallery of paintings of people being tortured just to provoke a reaction, that’s not art, it is provocation and anyone can do it; you just have to shout insults in a library to get the same effect. The effect being people realising that you’re a dickhead. The only difference is that the first dickhead has learned to paint and the second hasn’t.

Which leads me to the reason I was thinking about this; I’ve been quite ill for a couple of weeks, but that didn’t stop me travelling to London with some friends one day. I thought I was feeling better, but I wasn’t.

After a harrowing (but cheap) journey down we spent a long time wandering around. I don’t really remember it very well, due to being an idiot when I’m ill. So it was that I found myself at the Barbican, standing in a room with water pouring from the ceiling, in a patch of dryness that followed me around as I shuffled back and forth. I was in Random International’s Rain Room, and it was very interesting.

But is it art? I think so, mainly because it’s interesting. As far as I’m concerned ‘interesting’ and ‘beautiful’ are very often one and the same. I also think the fact that I was in a strange headspace helped it seem more surreal than perhaps it actually was.

So no, I haven’t really answered the question I posed in the title, but can you blame me? Art is a shifting, formless thing and beauty is so subjective that having a single term for it seems overly simplistic.

Essentially all we’ve learned here is that people being happy makes me happy.

Is that art?

James Bovington is a writer of many different things, although he’s confused as to whether any of it is ‘art’.

You can find him on Twitter at: @JBov or you can look at his blogs:

http://jbovington.wordpress.com AND/OR http://burndownthesun.tumblr.com

Steampunk Inspired Exhibition at Strood Library – Featuring Work By Creatabot of the Year Winner Richard Jeferies – 1st December to 4th January – Strood – Kent

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Lure

Creatabot was pleased to award Richard Jeferies with the Creatabot of the year award this week, and in recognition of his work, an exhibition has been organised at Strood library in Kent.

Richard Jeferies is an artist based on the Isle of Sheppey, who believes art is a language we can all use to communicate with each other. He is inspired by many forms of art, from traditional to modern.

The pieces Lure, Ad Astra and Babbage Mk IV (6 No.) were especially made for the exhibition and inspired by Steampunk styles. The piece “Lure” has also won Richard Jeferies the “Creatabot Creative 2012” award.

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Richard Jeferies with his Creatabot of the Year Award.

Richard learned to paint from his father who is an oils artist. His father, who lives in Wales, continues to paint whilst in his 70s. Richard teaches art to various ages and felt that by practicing different artistic techniques, it would help him present his students with a broad range of tools. In turn this helps the students to find the tool that connects with their particular creative spark. Also for him personally it creates the pleasure of discovering new and classic mediums for expression. He continues to pass on his experience and ideas to his own children, who all have their own distinctive styles, and hopes to one day hold a family exhibition.

The exhibition of his work will run from the 1st of December 2012 to the 4th January 2013 at:

Strood library

32 Bryant Road

Strood

Kent

ME2 3EP

Telephone: 01634 335890

Medway Libraries are proud to offer accessible services for everybody. Find out about access to services at Strood Library.

Opening times

  • Monday, 9am-7pm
  • Tuesday, 10am-6pm
  • Wednesday, 9am-6pm
  • Thursday, 9am-6pm
  • Friday, 9am-7pm
  • Saturday, 9am-5pm

If you are interested in purchasing some work please contact Richard on:

07808 216494

richard_jef@hotmail.com

www.richard-jeferies.com

www.facebook.com/sqube.squarecube

The exhibition also features photography by Mdhamiri Á Nkemi, a film maker and photographer based in Medway. He is an explorer of creativity and likes to learn and master many different production techniques. Mdhamiri is also very involved with the local creative community and likes to help it expand wherever possible.

www.energy-studios.webs.com

Area:    Kent     South East

Winter Medway Open Studios & Arts Festival – 8th to 9th December 2012

Medway Open Studios & Arts Festival is a community arts festival celebrating the wealth of creativity in Medway. The winter festival will take place across Chatham and Rochester on Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 December.

The Festival was a newcomer to Medway when a week long event launched in July 2012, following the success of the summer festival a winter weekend was planned. The winter Festival will include work from a variety of artists, including jewellery, sculpture, print, paint, photography and textiles. Over 50 local artists in total will open their doors to visitors displaying their work in various venues, including 16 artist studios and eight creative spaces.

Open studio festivals are successful across every county in Britain, with local artists opening their doors and inviting the public into their homes, studios and workshops. It’s a great opportunity to learn first-hand how different art forms are shaped, meet the artists and support the local crafts.

In the future, the organiser hopes the Festival will become an established annual event throughout Medway, with the summer 2013 Festival already in motion.

Festival Director Heather Burgess, 27 from Rainham, initiated the festival to uncover the amount of crafts being created in the Medway towns. “Medway is a perfect place for such a festival with so much going on in a comparatively small area. The nine venues taking part on the 8 and 9 December are all within a short walking distance of each other creating a great day out. The people are so interesting and the quality of work is inspiring.”

It’s not too late to take part, pitches are available in the Makers Market, an art and craft fair inside one of the host venues in Chatham. All types of craft are invited to sign up for a stall, for more information email medwayopenstudios@mail.com. Closing date is Friday 30 November.

To view images from all the winter Festival artists and to download a copy of the Festival guide visit www.medwayopenstudios.co.uk. Free festival guides can also be found at various venues in Medway and surrounding Kent. Alternatively, you can request a hard copy of the guide by emailing medwayopenstudios@mail.com.

Volunteers needed!

Are you a dab hand with a paint brush? Handy with a Henry?

If you would like to volunteer your time to help with the decorating at Sun Pier House they would love to hear from you!

Help is needed with the preparations at Sun Pier House in the lead up to their first event – The Makers Market on Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 December 2012. If you are willing to offer your time and have some hours free between Monday 19th November and Wednesday 5 December please get in touch. Email sunpierhouse@gmail.com

All good deeds will be rewarded with plenty of tea and biscuits!

Artists and groups taking part:

 

  • Ridley Road Group, Ridley Road, Rochester. A great mix of original editioned lino & etched prints. Hand crafted silver, beaded, acrylic & glass jewellery. Ceramics & fused glass pieces, small & large, wall mountable or free standing. Plump cushions & other decorative pieces made of beautiful fabrics.

 

  • Richard Reader, Ridley Road, Rochester. A collection of landscapes, seascapes, architectural, and abstract photography by Rochester based photographer.

 

  • Janice Emmott, Ridley Road, Rochester. Figure drawings and paintings; portraits, flowers, landscapes in an expressive style. Various mediums. Small drawings and paintings from £10

 

  • Nikki Price, Ridley Road, Rochester. Tales from the Darkroom’ – a re-imagining of classic Fairy Tales using film photography. The exhibition also includes a series of photographs challenging perceptions of body image.

 

  • Jacqueline Atkinson, Langdon Road, Rochester. I love making things and have turned my hand to individually crafted bags in unusual fabrics with interesting linings
  • Coal Shed Press, Boundary Wharf, Rochester. Fine and glorious prints and works on paper in variousmedia.

 

  • Printed Wonder, Boundary Wharf, Rochester. Gocco prints, screen prints, stationery and textiles with colourful designs and illustration. WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

 

  • Hazel Christine, Makers Market, Sun Pier House, Chatham. Vibrant, bold paintings showcasing mypassion for colour. Focussing on abstract, some landscape, portrait & still life.

 

  • CTRL-ALT-DEFEAT Clothing, Makers Market, Sun Pier House, Chatham. We will be selling our latest line of ‘Geek-Chic’ apparel, as well as promoting our custom garment printing services.

 

  • Ben Cameron, Makers Market, Sun Pier House, Chatham. My work ranges from doodles to highly detailed large illustrations. I’ll be selling doodles, cards, tote bags and tee’s.

 

  • Simon Richardson, Makers Market, Sun Pier House, Chatham. Contemporary photographer. I don’t have the ability to make things happen, I just hope to be there when they do.

 

  • Nucleus Artists, Nucleus Arts Centre, High Street, Chatham. 30 Artists showing original works of Arts & Crafts. Gallery showcasing Resident Artists work. Affordable arts Scheme. Café open.

Rewriting, Editing and Patchwork Quilts by Jane Ayres

Quilt cushion cover made by Mrs Brenda White. Photo by her niece Jane Ayres

Writing is hard.  Creating something from nothing, from the recesses of your imagination, can sometimes feel a bit like pulling teeth.  Your own.  But when you’ve overcome that painful first stage of the process and you have pages of words in some kind of structure, you can sit back and reflect.  Then start editing.

I love editing.  It’s fun.  It’s all about refining and sculpting the words until you have the perfect combination.

Rewriting, on the other hand, is different.  And for me this often comes after work has been submitted to a third party, such as an agent or publisher.  This is when you get feedback that indicates that some substantial work is required to improve the piece and make it acceptable for publication.  I always groan when this happens.  Rewriting can be like unpicking knitting.   And a bit like doing a cut and paste in your head.   A mental jigsaw puzzle.

It is especially tough when you might have to sacrifice that special sentence that you felt so pleased about because it no longer works, or rewrite – or even delete – the character you were so fond of.   Or restructure the first section of the book.   The thing is, each change has a knock-on effect for everything else in the story.  You might solve one problem, but create another.

But then, writing is all about problem solving, especially in fiction. You invent the characters and then set them into an imaginary landscape with a host of issues and situations that will change them and their lives.  But you do it with love.

I often think of writing a novel as a bit like creating a patchwork quilt.  You have the pattern and you have selected the fabric of your story, and now you have to patiently connect everything together, piece by piece, blocking and layering the colours and textures of your characters and their journeys, until you have created a beautiful, unique work of art.

To find out more about Jane’s publishing experiences, go to her blog www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk

Her trilogy of Matty Horse and Pony Adventures books for pre-teens and teens (and nostalgic older readers) are available as ebooks on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. All profits from these stories are going to Redwings Horse Sanctuary. 

Matty and the Racehorse Rescue is FREE TO DOWNLOAD from 23rd-27th November!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Matty-Problem-Ponies-Adventures-ebook/dp/B0094KJEVI/

Made In Clerkenwell – Winter Open Studios at Craft Central – 2 buildings 100 designers – 22nd to 25th November 2012 – London

Craft Central opens the doors to its two fascinating Victorian buildings – start your visit in Clerkenwell Green and then find St John’s Square just 2 minutes away. Go ‘behind the scenes’ and explore the workshops of this renowned design community. Whether you’ve got an hour or a whole day, mingle with the makers in the studios where they work their magic. One ticket allows unlimited access over 4 days, including Thursday’s launch event and Friday’s late night shopping.

Avoid the high street this Christmas and opt for handmade! Pick up jewellery, fashion, interior products, ceramics, accessories and traditional crafts by 100+ selected UK designers. Choose a gift, commission a unique piece, find a bespoke design service or just browse… this shopping treat is topped off by meeting the maker.

Craft Central is famous for great jewellery design – this November, adorn yourself with big names like Sonia Cheadle, Sarah Herriot, Amy Keeper and Mark Nuell. Continuing the fashion theme, milliner to the stars (including Fern Cotton, Dita Von Teese, Alexa Chung and Lily Allen) Katherine Elizabeth is on hand with vintage-inspired hats for the party season and cover up with Kate Jones’ gorgeous knitwear.

Once you’ve decorated yourself, why not focus on your home? The Showcase gallery plays host to a Pop Up Design Shop brimming with gorgeous interior products, including Susan Bradley’s sleek London Landmark bookends. In the studios – find a world of intricacy in Ikuko Iwamoto’s ceramics, Michelle Mason’s London inspired interior products brighten any home, Helen Beard’s hand-illustrated characters come to life on hand-thrown porcelain and spot your favourite London street in Vic Lee’s unmistakable prints.

Go back to the roots of making and discover the fascinating processes… and get your Christmas shopping done too! Refuel with refreshments from Chop’s Cakes and the food market in St John’s Square.

Launch Night on Thurs 22 Nov, 5-8pm

Late Night Shopping on Fri 23 Nov, 12noon – 8pm

Avoid high street crowds on Sat 24 & Sun 25 Nov, 12-5pm

Craft Central has TWO buildings:
21 Clerkenwell Green EC1R 0DX & 33-35 St John’s Square EC1M 4DS

Admission £3 each (under 16’s free)

onshow@craftcentral.org.uk

020 7251 0276

Writing and Publishing my First Book – Talk By Denis Pepper – 29th November 2012 – Folkestone

An accomplished and popular local speaker with a wide range of interests, Denis Pepper began public speaking as a 10-year-old in the CWS Music and Literary Festivals. On joining Folkestone Round Table he became a prominent member of their hugely successful Debate Team. Subsequently he has been in demand as a Rotarian speaker and, since publishing his book Botolphin 2010, which was inspired by the seventh century Benedictine monk, Saint Botolph, Denis has given talks throughout Kent and Sussex. In the summer he spends his time sailing (and writing) in the Mediterranean.  

He has just completed his second book in the Botolph Trilogy.

Denis Pepper will talk about the discipline of organising a writing routine, and technical issues such as the design and printing of book-covers, describing how to bind the trial copies cheaply and easily yourself. He justifies this extra work by pointing out that with self-publishing it is essential to get things right before sending the finished product to the printers, whose job does not include correcting errors; you must either do that yourself or employ the services of a professional.

He will also cover areas of importance that will include reviews, marketing, Amazon, e-readers and battling with booksellers.

The talk is free to attend but advance booking is essential.

This event is open to the public.

Venue: University Centre Folkestone,
Time: 18:00 –  29th November 2012

Contact: Jane Seaman (email)
Telephone: 01303 760600
Url: www.ucf.ac.uk

‘Creativity, Productivity and Time Management’ by George Langridge

To me, using technology to boost my productivity is almost everything. I’ve spent almost two and a half years searching for a practical, cost free (or very cheap) method of managing my time, boosting my productivity and being creative. I think I have cracked it.

As a student and creative, trying to juggle time to fit everything in, staying creative and being productive is a big task. Since getting my MacBook Pro, I have used nearly every application I could find to see is it could keep me productive and creative. Now, I use a variety of applications, services and methods.

iCal

Versatile, multi-tasking and simple.

 iCal/Calender [Free]

I’ve found that the ability to have multiple email accounts with their individual tasks, events and labels is really handy. I can see when I am due to go to college, work experience or out on shoot. I can also see when things are due, when I need to see family/friends and remember birthday. If you have to manage a company or group – that has it’s own email – you can see what everyone else should be doing or more likely, what they should be doing. You also have the ability to attach notes, files and locations to the event.

Quick search

Spotlight [Free]

Spotlight search is one of the most helpful tools on the mac, you have the ability to find documents, contacts, events, applications and much more. I use this tool to quickly open applications and recent files, Spotlight search learns what you search for the most. For example, if I search the letter Spotlight will put Twitter as the top hit, the same applies to Final Cut Pro when I start to type fin… which makes finding things a lot easier. It may only seem to save a matter of seconds, but over the course of one days worth of use you save about half an hour at least. Spotlight is also configurable to search (or not search) user defined files and drives.

Evernote, Mindnode and Pocket.

Evernote, MindNode Lite and Pocket [Free]

These three applications, to me are my creative trio. Evernote lets you store notes that are synced with as many desktop and mobile devices that I want, similar to notes on iCloud, except with more options, more platforms and quicker syncing. MindNode is an application that lets you quickly create mind maps with no limit to the amount of nodes or characters at all. Pocket is a read later service, however I use it like I -occasionally- Pinterest, to save interesting articles, awesome designs and photography. When they’re used together they really help with creativity, and productivity for that matter.

Wunderlist.

Wunderlist [Free]

Wunderlist is a great productivity application, which syncs across multiple devices on multiple platforms. This application, unlike reminders, lets you add notes, due dates and gives you the ability to easily create lists. I use Wunderlist to help organise work loads, tasks and I have a list of things to buy/do for my house/bedroom. Lists can be shared between as many or few people as you wish, they get to see deadlines, notes and whether or not you have stared  (prioritised) a certain task. I do however, wish that this had integration for notification center and iCal/Calender, the option to attach files would be great too. I am however, told (via a tweet) that these three things are being developed as you read this, or are due to be developed very soon.

Geektool, pardon the back-up.

Geektool [Free]

As many people that follow me on Twitter/Facebook know, I absolutely love Geektool. The simple ability to add the time, date, system specs and more to your desktop is just unbelievable helpful. You can add so many aspects to your desktop via Geeklets and scripts which are readily available on the internet and fairly simple to write yourself. My Geektool set up consists of [left to right]; system information, random/chosen quotes to boost inspiration, time, day, date and month. This is a fairly basic set up, I’ve seen some that have; calender information, RSS feeds, weather and iTunes information.

Google Drive and Dropbox.

Google Drive and Dropbox [Free – standard storage option]

Google Drive and Dropbox, to me, are extremely helpful and essential applications/services. I use Google Drive to easily share and edit files with different people, this allows me to see what they’ve changed, as well as giving me the ability to change multiple options depending on who the file is being shared with. I use Dropbox to store templates, Final Cut Pro/Avid/Adobe workspace files and other files I use across different devices on a daily basis. I absolutely love these services and wish I could afford extra storage space for both Dropbox and Google Drive. Definitely recommend these services.

Labels in the Finder.

Labels in the Finder

Using colour labels within the Finder is nothing new for any mac user. However, in my opinion not usually for the right reasons. I don’t think that occasionally labeling a folder red, in order to grab your attention half way through a project is at all a good use of this powerful tool. As you can see I have labeled all of the possible colours, and I label everything -seems a little obsessive- which, at a glace lets me know which each folder and project is for.

These are just a few things I do to keep productive and creative. If you have any more ideas, comment, tweet or email me.

Twitter/Instagram: @georgelangridge

eMail: georgelangridge95@gmail.com

Featured Creative – Bryony Hacker – Visual Artist and Campaigner

17 year old Bryony Hacker has just completed her Extended Project Qualification. So what topic did she choose to study? Make a short film, like someone I know; study how to make a bridge; write a very long essay about wars in History?

No to all of those actually. She created a National Speed Limit sign out of Deer Skulls that she had collected on the side of her road. This road is the A22 on Ashdown Forest. Her aim was to raise awareness about dangerous driving on this road towards deer. She targeted teenagers at the college who are learning to driving or already driving to talk about her issue.

Bryony currently studies art photography at college in Uckfield and is aiming to go on to Art Foundation next year. This project not only raise awareness, but allowed her to create a sculpture with her artistic skills.

I spoke to Bryony after her presentation to her fellow students about the project.

What inspired you to create your sculpture?

I live beside a road which has the most deer collisions on in the UK. It has around 300 deer that die yearly on the road due to car collisions. Human fatalities happen as well (about once a year), but most people don’t know the figures because every thing is ‘dealt with’ by the forest rangers and the police. I wanted to raise awareness of this, even if I had to do it in a very visual way. All the sculls found on the sculpture have been deer hit on the road literally on my doorstep.

How long did it take to collect skulls and make the sculpture?

My brother and I collected the skulls when we were little.. every few months from about the age of 7, we walked along the road with tesco bags. Every time we went we collected about 3 bags full, so I guess i’ve been collecting on and off for about 10 years. I didn’t use all of them in the sculpture! And I’d say it took about 10 hours in total.

You have much news coverage planned, for example the local news paper, is this helping to promote this message?

I am intending to be in 2 local newspapers in the next few months, and hopefully in time get onto the BBC news. I think this would be fantastic because then people all over the country would know about the danger, and would maybe take more care when crossing the road; instead of driving way over 60mph with no realisation of what could jump in front of them. When the media coverage is finished, I think it will be very memorable still to drivers on the road.

 

Although the project is finished, Bryony’s campaign has not. She is starting a petition to have the speed limit lowered on the road. If you wish to know more about how you can help please comment on this post or email aostansfield@hotmail.co.uk and I will contact Bryony directly.

Thank you for reading.
By Alice Stansfield your friendly neighbourhood vlogger: http://www.youtube.com/user/HisLittleEmo
Feel free to Tweet me if you have any questions or feedback:  @hislittleemoo
Email me for anything extra: aostansfield@hotmail.co.uk

The Harshest Deadline Ever Levied – By James Bovington

(From Google)

I’m writing a novel.

I know, I know; who isn’t? Go into any overpriced coffee-delivery chain-pit in the world and you’ll be able to spot at least three people with Moleskine notebooks, or typing on Macs, who when prompted will spew words at you about their novel. About how it explores the deeper significance of caramel biscotti, or it’s about non-conventional love dodecahedrons in tribes of scholars living in log cabins in Alaska, and every character is called Jim, even the women, because conventional naming is just holding us back, man.

These people will usually be wearing tweed ironically or skinny jeans un-ironically and all of them will be plastered with that smug look that makes your rage-glands twitch. Some of them might even close their eyes as they describe a scene from their novel in great detail, like it’s transporting them to their own personal Nirvana and they can’t bear to look upon the real world while they frolic in it. This is your cue to punch them as hard as you can right in their awful neck, pour their mocha-frappe-London-fog-flat white-fuckwit-latte onto their Macbook (because it will be a Macbook) and run, howling, into the misty night.

Except in November, when you might just spot a nomadic tribe of Wrimos, bedecked in nothing but pieces of fruit; weary, harrowed eyes; frantic caffeine jitters and normal clothes.

‘Wrimos’ are what people refer to themselves as when they are participating in National Novel Writing Month, which I’ve mentioned before. (You can see it by clicking the second instance of the word ‘here’ in this sentence, here.)

So, as I say, I’m writing a novel, but far from taking me years to craft a pretentious masterwork with infinite layers of detail, none of them funny, I have precisely thirty days to write 50,000 words. Any less and I have not ‘won’, any longer and I have not ‘won’. I have one of the harshest deadlines ever levied on a person, and it’s self-inflicted. Not just by me, either; there are currently thousands of Wrimos busily scribbling or tapping away at their own 50,000 word minimum and at this exact point in time (which I suppose is in the past, from your perspective) there have been precisely 942,626,284 words logged by everyone combined. To put that into perspective, the entire Harry Potter series comprises some 1,084,958 words.

We are eight days into November.

It’s mind-boggling the amount of people who throw themselves at this challenge, and the enthusiasm with which they metaphorically flagellate themselves with this ridiculous deadline.

So far I’m 7,845 words in, which at this stage is ok but not great. The average by now is about 11,000 but I spent a weekend doing things with my friends and a day training someone at work (I essentially have to write at work, since it’s all I do during the week), which is three of my days spent not writing at all. A couple of days I wrote about 1000 words, some days nearer to 2000. I’m writing a near-future-sci-fi-murder-mystery. Not by conscious choice; it’s just that when I started writing my main character (a journalist. Write what you know.) found himself at a crime-scene and some facts didn’t click together properly. I thought I was going to be writing a pulp sci-fi drabble, all smooth chrome spaceships and laserguns and whathaveyou. I’ve ended up with a subcity slum under London, twenty minutes into the future in a subtly totalitarian police-state.

That’s the trouble with this kind of writing. There’s no time to force your story back onto the track you picked for it. It’s a brilliant exercise in compromise. For example, there’s a character who I intended to be throw-away, maybe two or three lines of dialogue, but she’s ended up building a nest in my head because I like her so much. I have resolved to kill her at some point, purely so she doesn’t derail the story. Her fate is sealed, as far as I can tell, but characters can be fickle.

There’s also the need to kill your inner editor. If a sentence is clunky or overwrought you have to leave it. There’s no time. You can’t listen to the voice in your head telling you something is stupid. I had to slip in a justification for something that happened pages later because I couldn’t go back. That’s another interesting exercise; you have to make things fit together coherently without being able to go back and rewrite sections. Murder-mystery lends itself to this, luckily: Agatha Christie used to just write the whole story and pick the least likely character to be the murderer, making all the evidence fit together right at the end.

The last thing I wanted to discuss before I stop writing this and go back to writing that is that I’ve gone bloody mental.

Only really in terms of writing (maybe you’d noticed?), but still it’s almost a problem. For example, I was just skimming my work and noticed I’d written the word ‘corners’ as ‘carners’, but instead of actually realising there was a problem I proceeded to read the rest of the paragraph giving the voice in my head an Irish accent.

I spent an entire paragraph explain how ‘regarding’ and ‘looking at’ are different.

I was physically unable to stop myself from writing an awful pun, then giggling at it like a schoolgirl.

One of my recent Tweets reads: ‘The Information Superhighway has no cycle-lane.’ I don’t remember why.

And

While typing the above sentence literally milliseconds ago I put my electronic cigarette down and now I have absolutely no idea where it is.

I’m not sure if I’m coming out of this unscathed, but at least I’m having fun.

That’s 978 words I could have typed for my novel. Oh god, the deadline is coming! It’s almost here!

By James Bovington, a writer of things.

The Art of Wish Fulfilment by Jane Ayres

ceramic horse by Jane Ayres
ceramic horse by Jane Ayres
ceramic horse by Jane Ayres

When I was a child, I longed to have my own horse.  This was destined never to happen, because apart from living in an urban area, my parents couldn’t afford it.  So I created my own private horse world.

I drew horses in pencil and ink, mostly copied from photographs.  I collected pictures of horses from magazines and stuck them into a series of scrap books, often thinking up stories to go with the pictures.  In my art class at school, we were given a lump of clay to create a ceramic piece.  Obviously, mine became a horse of sorts.  I struggled with the legs, so the solution was to have the horse lying down.  His tail kept falling off, so he became a cob with a stubby tail.  He was glazed and taken home proudly to my mum.  He occupied my windowsill for years and I still have him, 40 years later.  Maybe he wasn’t exactly a work of art but he had been born from my imagination, moulded into shape and was mine.

Drawing horses, collecting pictures of them and making them from clay was not enough.  It was natural that as I developed my passion for creative writing, I would write stories about them.  I created the horses, characters and the experiences I desired through my fiction.  The ultimate wish fulfilment.

I would love to know how many other writers or artists create the fantasy world they would love to inhabit through their art.

To find out more about Jane’s publishing experiences, go to her blog www.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk

Her trilogy of Matty Horse and Pony Adventures books for pre-teens and teen (and nostalgic older readers) are available for Kindle on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. All profits from these stories are going to Redwings Horse Sanctuary.

Matty and the Problem Ponies is FREE TO DOWNLOAD from 7th-11th November!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Matty-Problem-Ponies-Adventures-ebook/dp/B0094KJEVI/

Mare and Foal by Jane Ayres – still having trouble with the feet!

Partition Crazy

Lately I’ve been juggling a huge amount of files, from scratch disks to films to documents. A friend suggested I partition my hard drive to accommodate for use on; OS X, Windows and Linux as well as giving me -theoretically- separate disks/volumes for different file types, categories or recipients (ie. work for clients on one volume and personal work on another). Also, working on a mac, I want a drive to use as a time machine back-up.

Time Machine, looks futuristic.

I feel that, for both creatives, and techies alike this is a hot topic. I mean, do you multiply the amount of drives and lose space with each partition or keep your space and have an extensive folder system to navigate (if you’re as precious about your file and system organisation as I am) or do you just put your hand in your pocket, bite your lip and buy multiple external drives?

Partitioning a hard drive on any operating system is fairly easy, if you want to know how drop a comment below or tweet me. Although please note that when creating a partition in a hard drive, the drive will format itself so copy it all to your computers internal drive.

Disk utility for partitioning and repair.

I have had a play with partitioning an old 320gb USB 2.0 hard drive and here are my thoughts. My initial opinion was “why?” but after a while I began to find it extremely intuitive as I instantly knew which files where in which area and what types of files they would be, this meant it was a lot quicker to find what I wanted. I also tried partitioning based on what the files where (ie. personal, work, college, creatabot etc), I found this extremely helpful as it had a server/cloud like approach to finding files. I’m always pushing to increase my productivity, I found that this really does boost my productivity as it is so simple to find things. If like myself you work across different systems, formatting a partition to be compatible with Windows and the other partition Mac made life a lot easier when transferring files, code and other data. This means you don’t have to rely on services like; Dropbox (which is a great application, that I use daily), Google Drive and Droplr, which are a little slow for transferring files -this is not what they where designed for- but instead can just drag and drop between systems instantly (depending on file size).

Some of the downsides I found were; it took a few attempts to get the partition sizes right as different file types needed more space than others or different categories received more data than others, I could just make folders within the hard drive to separate things out that way which would mean I could rearrange things easily if space became an issue and it adds possibly unnecessary icons to your otherwise minimalist desktop (unless you’re a clutter offender).

Using a partitioned drive as a scratch disk is a really nifty way of staying organised although it does lead to a slight speed decrease (unless you’re running USB3.0, Firewire 800 or Thunderbolt where it is almost unnoticeable), I would recommend using hard drives as scratch disks for important edits as you can set each partition to collate certain data or duplicates. If you’re an ‘Avid’ user then a speedy partitioned hard drive is exceptionally helpful as you can set one partition as the linked volume, one as the linked drive/folder and another to store the rushes (obviously you’d back them up somewhere else as well, wouldn’t you?).

Avid link to volume.

Over all, I would definitely -if you have the space and a spare drive- recommend partitioning an external hard drive as I have found it boosts productivity and gives me the ability (when editing pictures or video) to save the edits, files and metadata on a separate drive to that of the all important RAW images or rushes.

Twitter/Instagram: @georgelangridge

Blinc Digital Arts Festival 2012

 

Photo: Craig Morrison and Joel Cockrill

October 26th, 27th and 28th saw the Castle town of Conwy, North Wales, transformed into a giant piece of digital art, numerous buildings in the town became projection backdrops for digital, video, sound and light art created by a host of local and national artists.

 

 

The event is currently in its second year, and like last year coincided with Wales’ largest food festival. The event also paid homage to Alan Turing.

Famed for his mathematical intelligence Turing was fundamental to The Enigma Machine success in the 2nd World War, and considered one of the forefathers of modern computing.

To mark the centenary of his birth, Artist / Curators Craig Morrison and Joel Cockrill were commissioned by the Arts Council of Wales to make a significant light work dedicated to Alan Turing.

The piece, which is entitled ‘Thank you’, was installed in Conwy Castle. Two large lasers programmed with Rolling Spheres or ‘Hyperboloids’ positioned high above the town on the castle towers, beamed green lights that swept across the sea and the sky, the beams flickering at a frequency calculated using Morse Code projecting ‘Thank You’ towards the heavens.

To accompany the lasers a large scale white neon positioned on a plinth, identical in size to the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, so that Turing’s poetic epitaph can be read while the lasers pulse into the night sky behind.

Craig states that “The significance of the plinth is inherent to the piece. The Fourth Plinth celebrates all that is contemporary in the arts today. Alan Turing’s abstract mathematical achievements epitomize what the plinth represents and in some way is responsible for probably most of the artwork that is displayed. His fundamental work in computing has helped to shape what we see in contemporary life. His wartime work on codebreaking definitely contributed to the preservation of our freedom of expression.”

 

Children’s drawings of Conwy projected onto the Civic Centre

 

Other artists taking part responded to the town and its history, here’s a few videos from my favourites:

 

Neil Coombs:

Neil’s work explores surrealism and its relationship with every day life, the photomontage video creates a face using ordinary everyday objects we normally don’t notice or give any time too:

 

Wendy Leah Dawson:

Wendy’s piece explored the swarm and hive mentality in bees, transforming an old chapel into a giant beehive, Wendy also paid homage to the towns historical bee keeping and honey traditions:

 

Alan Whitfield:

Alan’s video was projected onto the Castle – which was incredibly moving and overwhelming  – the scale, soundtrack and Alan’s presence made for a very powerful piece! Here’s the web version of the video and below that is a photograph by Roger Smith  of the projection on the Castle 

 

 

Elly Stringer + Alys Hughes:

I couldn’t find a version of Elly’s beautiful video entitled: ‘Hireath’ [loosely translates in English as ‘Longing’ – but there is no direct translation] that I could embed but she has put it up on her wonderful blog so head over there for a peek! The video was projected onto a bus outside of the British Legion, and watching it made me think of the time I spend daydreaming on the bus home from work, longing to get home, its a really evocative piece and beautifully made!

 

Alys, who performs in the video, each night completed a live dance performance in front of a projection inside the British Legion, which was stunning I have to say! Over the weekend they then repeated the performance this time in front of the projection on the castle – which unfortunately I missed 😦

 

It is a privilege to have such an amazing event right on my doorstep, and I count myself lucky to have seen it – especially considering the whole event was free! Well Done to all the team, organizers, helpers, Arts Council Wales, Cadw, Conwy County Council and of course the Artists involved!!

 

Garrets and Gatekeepers by Jane Ayres

Photograph by Chris Ayres
http://scubabeer.uk.to/jalbum

More than 30 years ago I wrote an article for the now defunct Composer magazine called Starving in Garrets.  It was all about how painfully difficult it was for composers to get their work performed and heard, and even harder to make a living from writing music.  In many ways, I don’t believe things have really changed that much for artists and creatives. There is still that struggle for discoverability.

I’m a writer, primarily.  But I’m also a musician and have worked with contemporary composers.   I recently read some sobering statistics for writers.  For example, in 2011 there were 211,269 self-published titles and out of at least 1.2 million titles published by the entire industry over the course of a year, almost 80% sell fewer than 100 copies. (source: http://www.thebookdesigner.com/2012/09/7-book-marketing-mistakes/)

So how on earth do you get people’s attention? If you are a writer, it’s pretty tough.  If you are a composer, it’s even harder. We measure success by fame and celebrity status, regardless of quality.  So if you aren’t yet a “name” you are largely invisible.   How do you get the “gatekeepers” to listen to your music, or read your work? For anyone to take you seriously? If you are lucky, maybe 1 in 30 people you contact might reply and follow up your work. Many years ago, I decided to speculatively contact film production companies about one of my books.  I sent 35 emails with a pitch, had 2 replies, and this resulted in one meeting with a producer.  I was told this was a pretty good result!

The more successful you are, the busier you become.  Famous people have a whole raft of assistants (gatekeepers) which make it even harder to be heard.  Even a negative reply is a response, which acknowledges your existence.  You have been read, listened to.  Your creation is personal and precious and being ignored is far worse than rejection, though you may not agree.

But negotiating huge organisations like the BBC, for example, can be like scaling an impenetrable fortress.  If anyone knows how you manage to get a Proms commission I would love to hear from you.

Of course, the internet provides a global shop window on an unprecedented level.  Writers can publish without publishers, artists can create online galleries, composers and musicians can put their work on platforms like You Tube.  We can let the public judge.  As Natasha said in a previous post, artists don’t generally follow their calling for the money.  But they do need to be acknowledged, and better still, enjoyed.  They want to share their work.  That’s the whole point.

And so, with Xmas looming on the horizon, I’m including a recently discovered You Tube link to a moving performance of a haunting  Carol which a Canadian choir have used for their candlelit procession over the past 5 years.  The music was written by a UK composer who should be far better known.  Simply beautiful!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIyhg8e04cI

To find out more about Jane’s publishing experiences, go to her blogwww.janeayres.blogspot.co.uk

Her trilogy of Matty Horse and Pony Adventures books for pre-teens and teens (and nostalgic older readers!) are available for Kindle on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. All profits from these stories are going to Redwings Horse Sanctuary.

Why Creatives Lose Their Mind : And How Not To – By Natasha Steer

By Hugh MacLeod

I am no physiologist, let me get that straight. And I certainly know mental illness is a real and horrible sickness that affects thousands of people, often from birth. But I want to express my issues with this article:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19959565 

 I am very creative, I do not have a mental health problems. I have friends who are creative, who do not have mental health problems. The issue in fact is this, yes, creatives are different. Creative people are biologically different, they are less inclined to fear standing out, being different and creating unique work. But…this argument also stands: EVERYONE HAS THE ABILITY TO BE CREATIVE. Which would therefore mean…yes…WE ALSO ALL HAVE THE ABILITY TO HAVE A MENTAL ILLNESS – should circumstances push it upon us.

The reason I wanted to write this is because I have close friends who are openly creative, and continue to struggle emotionally in this world. Society is not in a place in which it can support creative people, especially not creatives that are sensitive, which most are, because we are generally more passionate about helping to change the world we live in and help people.

Work is generally monotonous and people are not employed for their creativity, or used within employment to generate ideas with their creativity. The situation is made worse when an individual has health problems and again society does not support the idea of working part-time too well. The creative individual is left feeling useless, unfulfilled and not understood – and this generally leads to depression, which gets labeled as “mental illness”, which only makes society support the individual EVEN LESS, and can easily lead to long term mental health problems.

The solution? Creative people need to be supported and used more within society, they need to be able to freely express their creativity, and be employed by people who listen to their ideas. I think we all know how often that happens, and unfortunately I know the UK in particular in not supportive of creatives in the work place. They continue to struggle for work, get pushed beyond all limits when they are employed, and get shut down for thinking, creating and innovating. And what happens when that keeps happening to you? You feel depressed, useless, and give up.

One of the reasons I set up Creatabot is because I see this pattern happening over and over again, and then the media print articles like this saying that creativity is linked with mental illness, and I have to admit, it makes me quite angry, because society cannot see that often these creative people have been pushed away for being “different” and for being “over sensitive”.

The most hilarious part? Creativity is essential to exist, and to succeed. But funnily enough most of the decision makers in organisations continue to ignore this!

So my fellow creative people, before we all go crazy, I urge you to read the following and get the support you need to survive as a creative on the planet that is Earth, because we can make it a better place.

“The crea­tive per­son basi­cally has two kinds of jobs: One is the sexy, crea­tive kind. Second is the kind that pays the bills. Some­ti­mes the assign­ment covers both bases, but not often.” – Hugh MacLeod

An awesome book that encourages creatives to keep being creative and not take any nonsense, by Hugh MacLeod.

Based on the hit handmade zine THE ARTIST IN THE OFFICE is an inspirational, interactive book for any artist living in the real world. It encourages small acts of creativity and a simple shift of perspective to help readers bring their artistic selves into the workplace and thrive in all aspects of their lives. Readers are prompted to undertake a wide range of liberating activities, from the mundane to the sublime, that won’t put their nine to five job at risk.

Creative people who spend no time at all with other creative people will start to feel profoundly alone. Connect with like-minded weirdos. Online. In-person. You are not a sad friendless little tugboat.

http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2012/08/07/25-ways-to-survive-as-a-creative-person/

“Seek out and surround yourself with POSITIVE people! Don’t let negative people get you down – it will dramatically alter the way you feel, work and live. We all know them; there is usually at least one person in our lives that is constantly moaning, and telling you that your latest idea won’t work. Creative people are sensitive people, therefore we tend to get sucked in by the negative ones, and before you know it, you’re feeling down yourself!” – Annabel Williams

http://tinyurl.com/d66lwhm

By Natasha Steer

@natashasteer

The Assassin, The Grey Man and The Surgeon – A New Book By D C Stansfield

Here is the book cover designed by D C Stansfield, photograph starring Joseph Jameson, photographed/edited/printed by Alice Stansfield.

(Picture above features Joseph Jameson mentioned here: https://creatabot.co.uk/2012/10/09/robin-epq-short-film-by-alice-stansfield-2012/)

D C Stansfield has completed his first ever book – and, what’s this!? HE’S BEEN PUBLISHED! On the new form of ‘book’, an ‘Ebook’ on Kindle! Named, ‘The Assassin, The Grey Man and The Surgeon’ it’s the first book in the series of three which he is hoping to write if the book is popular enough.

Why do I sound so excited? Well D C Stansfield is my father and I am a very proud and inspired daughter to have another creative in the family. So far the book has received 99% 5 Star satisfaction on the UK Amazon store, with only 1% voting 4 stars (which is still high!)

A short summary of the book (adaptation of the blurb):

It was all going so well for Peter Lee’s drug empire. The only small annoyance had come from a little old lady who owned of all things a small corner shop. She had refused to accept any of his little parcels and wanted to go to the police, so she’d been given two bullets, the ‘double tap’, both to shut her up and to send a message to everyone else in the network.

Unknown to Lee she was married to a specialist, a man who, in a former life killed men for a living. He had two friends, one a gatherer of information, the master in his field, one a breaker of men, who was so vicious that it was rumoured that each time he hit a man he cut him. Each of these three men had spent thirty years and more playing the ‘great game’. Inside the security company called ‘The Firm’ they were legends known only as The Assassin, The Grey Man and The Surgeon.

Now living at the edge of the secret world and about to disappear into history, this atrocity had brought them back centre stage but the question is, do they still have what it takes to go up against today’s hard men?

I am currently reading the book and already stuck in, loving it, although can’t get the vision of my dad out my head which it amusing when you follow the storyline. We are a very proud household to say the least.

But how does one promote a book when one knows nothing about ‘publishing and advertising?’ Well, my dad came to the right place. ME. YouTuber/Tweeter/Tumblr/Facebooker/Genereal-confident-girl-in-emailing-companies/Currently-doing-media-work-experience and Creatabot blogger. (Most of the words are made up I will admit, but my point still stands). Therefore I’m spreading the word as best I can. Although, don’t feel I need to as sales have rocketed as one might say! It’s going rather well for it’s first WEEK out on the web!

Here you can watch a video where I give you all the details on the book, and in a couple of weeks I will be doing a full review of my opinion and it won’t be bias because he’s my dad I’ve told him I want to be honest. I am encouraging others to join me, read the book in my ‘by the end of November challenge’ (meaning read the whole book by the end of November) comment or send me your review on aostansfield@hotmail.co.uk and I will be making a Review video with honest opinions from as many people as possible. I’d love you to be one of them.

In return, I will be mentioning your YouTube channel, blog post, website etc on my video so promoting everyone as we go. If you don’t want anything promoted or want to remain anonymous that’s fine too. If you have any questions for the author himself I’m sure I can persuade him (in other words, he’d love to) personally email you.

In summary –

The book is called ‘The Assassin, The Grey Man and The Surgeon’.

It’s available here on Kindle: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Assassin-Grey-Surgeon-ebook/dp/B009NUUI8M

Free Sample Sample: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Assassin-Grey-Surgeon-ebook/dp/B009NUUI8M#reader_…

It costs only £1.53 and is available on the American Amazon (.com rather than .co.uk).

My email is aostansfield@hotmail.co.uk for any questions and honest reviews.

Thank you for reading.

By Alice Stansfield your friendly neighbourhood vlogger: http://www.youtube.com/user/HisLittleEmo

Feel free to Tweet me if you have any questions or feedback:  @hislittleemoo

Email me for anything extra: aostansfield@hotmail.co.uk

Create Jewellery – Lincolnshire: Jewellery, Tiara, Shoe Crystalizing & Christmas Decoration Workshops

At Create Jewellery, we offer a large range of workshops in both Kent and Lincolnshire. As well as one-to-one classes, we run workshops which typically have a maximum class size of no more than 8-10 learners to ensure you get the support and dedication that you deserve. Not only are the workshops a great opportunity to learn a new skill and hobby, but many use it as a way to start a new business from home! What could be better than sitting at home making jewellery to sell!

As well as learning, you will have fun chatting to others who share your interests, as well as drinking tea and eating cupcakes which is all included in the price! You will also get to make items at the workshops that you can take home with you, with the reassurance that all materials are included in the set price!

We have recently released the following workshop dates for Lincolnshire, held in Grantham:

Sunday 14 October

  • Wire wrapped coctail rings / bangles taster workshop (10.30am – 1pm) – £36 including all materials, cupcakes and tea/coffee
  • Shamballa and friendship bracelet workshop (2pm – 4.30pm) – £37 including all materials, cupcakes and tea/coffee

Saturday 3 November 

  • Vintage inspired jewellery, hair accessories & birdcage veils taster workshop (2pm – 4.30pm)
    £36 including all materials, cupcakes and tea/coffee.

Saturday 24 November

  • Jewellery making taster workshop (10am – 12.30pm) £36 including all materials and cupcakes
  • Tiara making taster workshop (1.30pm – 4pm) – £36 including all materials and cupcakes.

Sunday 25th November

  • ‘Decorate Your Shoe’ workshop (crystalizing stiletto heels or converse trainers)  – (10am – 2pm), £79 which includes over 1000 crystals that you will use plus other materials to crystalize your own shoes / trainers, as well as tea/coffee and cupcakes.

Sat 8 December

  • Beaded Christmas Decorations & Rag Wreath (2pm – 4.30pm) – £40 including all materials

Sunday 9 December

  • Tiara making workshop (10.30am – 2.30pm) – £69 – all materials & cupcakes included

For further information, please email Rachel at createjewellery@hotmail.co.uk or book online at www.createjewellery.co.uk

Nesta Call for Artwork – Closes 26th November

Nesta is the UK’s innovation foundation. They help people and organisations bring ideas to life by providing investments and grants and mobilising research, networks and skills.

Nesta are looking for art to inspire their staff and visitors, transform their busy networking and events space, giving budding artists from across the country the opportunity to showcase their creativity to a large and diverse audience.

So, if you are looking for a space to showcase your work – which could include photography, video, sculpture, ceramics, fashion or fine art – that reflects Nestas core mission ‘to make the UK more innovative’, then they would love to hear from you. Anyone is welcome to apply – from budding art students to passionate amateurs to creative retirees. For more information on how to apply visit the Nesta website.

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Folkestone Book Festival Events at University Centre Folkestone – 6th to 8th November 2012

As part of the annual Folkestone Book Festival, the community engagement
team from University Centre Folkestone have once more organised a series
of events with a range of speakers to inspire and stimulate discussion.
All events take place at UCF and are free to attend.  However advance
booking is required.   Events are listed below – click on the weblink
provided for all the details of each event, including information about
the speakers.  Thank you.

Tues 6 November
2.30 – 3.30pm: Celebrated journalist and writer Vitali Vitaliev gives a
talk about his book on Europe, Passport to Enclavia
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3482

6pm-7pm : Panel discussion: “Can a book save your life?”
Panellists include Vitali Vitaliev, Julian Baggini, Carolyn Oulton and
Jane Davis from The Reader Organisation.
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3485

Weds 7 November
6-7pm : The Ego Trick: talk by author Julian Baggini, writer, journalist
and co-founder of The Philosophers’ Magazine
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3479

Thurs 8 November
3pm  – 4pm: A Writer’s Journey.  Author Karen Lesley and Zoe Meyer,
Director of Zoes Books, discuss the creation of Karen’s book Coleman
(Female), with Zoe’s perspective on facilitating the book production and
working with the writer.
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3480

6pm-7pm : Panel discussion: “Should writers be their own publishers?”
Panellists include Zoe Meyer (Director of Zoe’s Books), Martin Latham
(Manager, Waterstones, Canterbury), Mark Swain, (writer and consultant),
Chris Meade (writer and Director of if:book UK), writer and blogger
Katherine May and writer and speaker Jane Wenham-Jones (Chairperson)
http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/events/event-details.asp?eventId=3481

For more details contact UCF on 01303 760600 or email
jane.seaman@canterbury.ac.uk

The Winter Medway Open Studios at the Nucleus Arts Centre – 8th to 9th December 2012

2 buildings. 34 artists, crafts people and designers.

The Nucleus Arts Centre, Chatham, will be opening their doors and studios to the public for one weekend, the 8th – 9th December. as part of the Winter Medway Open Studio and Arts Festival. With such an array of local artists, designers and crafts people on show at affordable prices, you’ll be happy to leave the high street behind and come to Nucleus.

Nucleus Arts Centre and studios will be open to the public on 8th to 9th December from 10am – 6pm, 272 High street Chatham ME4 4BP

Resident artists open studios:
Holly Aird
Angie Berkley
Sian Bostwick Jewellery
Donna Chapman
Nick Evans
Jon Gubbay
Darrell Hawkins
Sophie Jongman
Sarah Langstone
Marissa Mardon
Maggie Osborn
Peter Reeds
Christopher Sacre
Deborah Saunders
Anne Taylor
Chris Van Beck
Alexandria Welch
Obi Photography

Area: South East

Why It Is Important To Write Contracts – By Natasha Steer

When I was 17 I made a music video for a local band, it was my first paid creative job. I assumed the band would help someone so new to the world of business and provide me with some promo. What in fact happened was that the band posted the video on their website and did not mention once who had made it. As you can imagine I was pretty upset and had a chat with the band to try to resolve the issue.

Kindly the lead singer suggest we form a contract, and helped me in putting something together. I learnt quickly how important contracts are, although sometimes I still forget, and then regret being so absent-minded.

We would like to think people won’t take advantage, but sometimes it is just a misunderstanding that can lead to issues. Therefore I highly recommend, even when dealing with friends and family, to have a contract in place where finances or even just recognition are an issue. The band as mentioned earlier, changed their website to give me recognition for the video I made and I agreed that I would not use the video for anything commercial without their permission first.

I personally feel we should always recognise people and attribute them where ever possible, which is why I love Creative Commons licences. For the benefit of others, here is a draft contract layout for people to use for their creative projects. Adjust as necessary.

Contract of agreement in relation to:

Between:

I                                        , in representation of                                             , agree to the following:

To pay                                          the amount of  £                     upon completion of

To acknowledge                               , where ever the work is used and displayed.

That if the work is not delivered there will be no charge/compensation payable by any parties involved.

Signed

Date

I                                      in representation of                                           agree to the following:

To complete the work requested by the date of

That if the work is not completed by this deadline, I agree to deduct the amount of                          for each week of the delay.

If the work is not delivered there will be no charge/compensation payable by any parties involved.

To ask permission to use the work for commercial reasons.

Signed

Date

Signatures witnessed by:

Print Name

Signed

Date

You will need to add requirements as personally needed for the project, and make sure BOTH parties have a copy. Here are some extra notes.

  • A witness is not really required for basic contracts, but I recommend it still. However a contract made with organisations and large authorities actually constitutes as a DEED and does always require a witness. For further explanation visit http://www.freshbusinessthinking.com/articles_print.php?CID=8&AID=1648
  • A witness of a contract must not be a relative or someone legally involved in the project.
  • There will be certain circumstances in which the creator and the person you are creating for cannot fill the requirements, for instance, you may get sick, they may get sick and they also may not be able to pay you! You need to add these details into the contract as to what the circumstances are if this was to happen.
  • I also found this article useful http://helgahenry.com/why-written-agreements-are-preferable-to-oral

p.s I am no legal advisor but realise you do not have to be to create a basic contract, however when large sums of money are involved and with big companies, I recommend taking legal advice.

By Natasha Steer

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

Notes From The Creatabot Workshop: Expanding Your Creativity – By Natasha Steer

For the benefit of those who came and those who could not make the workshop here is a list of the subjects discussed. If you would like me to give the workshop in your area or in your community/creative group please contact me on natasha@creatabot.co.uk

EXPANDING YOUR CREATIVITY

WORKSHOP NOTES

  • Creatabot is an independent website and online magazine for creatives. Its aim is to inspire and support creative individuals. We work closely with the creative community to help develop ideas and try new ideas. We like to make things happen.
  • I work closely with coFWD – a community led work space. Find out more about them by watching this short film. coFWD is based at 161 Rochester High Street, Kent. You can pop by any time to find out more and see the space. Please watch the video before hand so you know what to expect! http://cofwd.org

Event Organising

  • If you want to organise an event, the best thing you can do first and foremost is write a press release. The basic order for a press release is the following:

Headline

Who?

What? 

When? 

Where?

Why?

Contact details

Image

You only need about 3 paragraphs of information for your press release.

Here is an example:

Artist Sarah Maple Launches Major Solo Exhibition

Artist Sarah Maple is to hold her first major solo exhibition at the Aubin Gallery, Shoreditch, London, from the 9th of February to 9th March 2012.

Sarah Maple’s exhibition “It’s a Girl!” takes a slightly controversial, but tongue in cheek look at what it is to be a woman and Muslim in the modern day. The work on show takes a more questioning look at traditionally accepted identity, gender and religion whilst revealing the young artists unique talent.

Currently living in Sussex, UK, 27 year old Sarah Maple has displayed work in various exhibitions in New York, Canada, Israel and Europe. Inspired by her own Muslim background, Sarah Maple uses photography and paintings to get her personal message across about subjects that have become socially acceptable and brings attention to the faults in this thinking.

End

Contact Details of Organiser

IMAGE

Creatabot can set you up with an account so that you can promote your creative related events, anywhere in the UK. email natasha@creatabot.co.uk to make it happen!

  • When you need an image to promote an event, do not use someone else’s images without their permission. It isn’t work risking! Instead go to Flickr and go to advanced search, use words linked to your event and tick the  Only search within Creative Commons-licensed content.

If the event is for profit then you need to tick the “Find content to use commercially”.

  • Find out more about Creative Commons Licences, it could protect your precious work also!

http://creativecommons.org 

All creatives need to know about these licences!

Online Presence

  • The key to social media ( Twitter/ Facebook) is NOT to try and hard sell.
  • Express your personality, whilst also being neutral and professional.
  • People can unfollow you / unfriend you for silly reasons!
  • Post images of your work.
  • Facebook and Twitter can be linked, so that you only post something once.

Pinterest is an easy way to create an online portfolio.

WEEBLY is a great easy way to make a FREE website that can be linked to your domain name.

POP UP SHOPS

Dan Thompson has put together the Empty Shops Network – which is a great resource for people wanting to run a pop up shop. The Pop Up Business of Dummies is brilliant. A PDF is available here:

http://emptyshops.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/developing-your-pop-up-plan1.pdf

But I recommend a hard copy, which can be bought on Amazon.

Pop Up Shop people:

Are willing to embrace the temporary nature of an opportunity, and agile enough to adapt and change as the opportunity does.

Always have an eye on the future, using a pop up to inform or inspire another plan or project, or to prototype a new business. They are interested in the long-term sustainability of their work.

Funding

The two main bodies for funding continue to be your local council and the Arts Council. Out of the two, your local council are likely to be more helpful.

MEDWAY PEOPLE: There is an artist resource centre inside the Visitor Information Centre in Rochester High Street. Inside the room there are folders packed with information about applying for funding with lots of different organisations, its brilliant!

You can book time in the room by calling  01634 338319

  • In the future in the UK, KICKSTARTER will be an awesome way to get funding. Have a look!

www.kickstarter.com

Community Projects

Helping your local community is a great way to expand your creativity, a great way to get people together for a particular project  is by using:

www.wewillgather.co.uk

That’s all for now! Thank you for reading!

By Natasha Steer

Area:   UK   Britain   East of England   East Midlands   London  North East   North West    Yorkshire    Scotland    South East South West    Wales   West Midlands

MAKE – Come and MAKE Things In Rochester – 13th October 2012 – 7.30pm

MAKE is an opportunity to get creative in any medium, in a social setting, and have lots of fun.

Moogie Wonderland are creating lots of Jellyfish for the Fish Disco at the end of October – and need lots of help! All materials will be supplied. Mainly for adults, but children welcome if supervised by a parent.

We recommend an apron or wearing old clothes!

WIFI will be available for those of you working on projects on your computer.

Time : 7.30 pm on Saturday the 13th of October

Location: 161 Rochester High Street

If you going to attend please post a comment below 🙂

Area: South East

Beach Creative Workshops – Herne Bay – Kent


In addition to ongoing exhibitions in their two galleries, Beach Creative in Herne Bay has launched some new workshops.  

  • Tuesday 10am-12noon – Calligraphy, £6 per hour. Must pre-book with Graham 07765 034908
  • Tuesday 7-9pm, £5 per session. Figure drawing (clothed) with Bobi Sanders. Must pre-book on 07512 341112
  • Thursday 10am – 12noon, £10 per session. Introduction to Art and Design (first week of four). Must pre-book with Sarah on 07943 731786
  • Thursday 7-9pm, £5 per session. Life Drawing (unclothed) – untaught session. Must pre-book with Gill on 07545 787955

Please visit the website for updates at www.beachcreativecic.co.uk

Area: South East